Inspectors slam The Bilingual Primary School over level of teaching

Headteacher Carolina Gopal

Headteacher Carolina Gopal

First published in News
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A bilingual school, which uses English and Spanish, has failed to impress inspectors on its teaching of the foreign language.

The Bilingual Primary School has received a disappointing first Ofsted inspection report after assessors gave the school its second lowest rating of requiring improvement.

Inspectors said that the Spanish skills of pupils at the Brighton-based school, which opened in October 2012, were “not well developed”.

The criticism is even more surprising as a sizeable minority of pupils have Spanish as a first language.

Teaching staff at the state-funded free school said Ofsted’s conclusions on their Spanish teaching were a “mystery” and questioned whether inspectors had the right criteria to judge their unique school.

Ofsted inspectors visited the school, which is currently based in classrooms in Brighton Aldridge Community Academy, Lewes Road, on June 18 and 19.

The level of teaching was described as being “not consistently good enough” while teachers were assessed as not always being clear enough about what they want pupils to learn.

Pupils were also criticised for not listening carefully enough and for poor and late attendance.

But it was not all bad for the school with inspectors praising standards that were above those typical for pupils’ ages while school leaders had made recent improvements in teaching and pupils’ progress.

The school is set to move into a new site at a former council depot in The Droveway, Hove, in September next year.

There are currently 142 pupils at the school but the new three-storey building could eventually accommodate up to 630 pupils.

Opponents to the move say that the school has not proved its credentials yet to justify Brighton and Hove City Council’s decision made last month to lease them the land at a peppercorn rate for 125 years.

The school was also the subject of a Department for Education investigation in April over whistleblower claims and although the report cleared the school of any fraud, they were cautioned over their failure to follow financial rules.

Ofsted also found fault with the power structures in the school, calling for improvements in how governors held senior leaders to account.

The school has now been advised to carry out an external review of governance to assess how leadership and management could be improved.

Headteacher Carolina Gopal said the school had the backing of parents who were still “incredibly supportive” despite the Ofsted findings.

She added: “We are disappointed by Ofsted’s verdict as we don’t believe it is a true reflection of our school.

“Our pupils are outperforming normal students by 20% in some cases and we have had four unrelated independent experts who have been more than satisfied with our methods.”

Comments (49)

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7:16am Thu 24 Jul 14

Quiterie says...

The first thing to do when you receive a poor Ofsted is accept the findings and try and move on, implementing measures to address the issues raised in the report.

This headteacher is obviously still in denial that anything is wrong. If you read the full report the inspectors are very specific about where improvements need to be made. Ofsted take a pretty dim view of schools that don't accept their findings.

Saying things like "our pupils outperform normal students by 20% in some cases" is meaningless. The report makes it very clear that more able pupils are not being stretched for example.

The report also mentions that teachers say things in Spanish and then English and because the children know that the English translation is coming up they don't listen to the Spanish. When the children speak in Spanish they only use one or two words. So no real 'mystery' there as the school claims.

As this school is getting so much public money I hope it succeeds, but this isn't a great start.
The first thing to do when you receive a poor Ofsted is accept the findings and try and move on, implementing measures to address the issues raised in the report. This headteacher is obviously still in denial that anything is wrong. If you read the full report the inspectors are very specific about where improvements need to be made. Ofsted take a pretty dim view of schools that don't accept their findings. Saying things like "our pupils outperform normal students by 20% in some cases" is meaningless. The report makes it very clear that more able pupils are not being stretched for example. The report also mentions that teachers say things in Spanish and then English and because the children know that the English translation is coming up they don't listen to the Spanish. When the children speak in Spanish they only use one or two words. So no real 'mystery' there as the school claims. As this school is getting so much public money I hope it succeeds, but this isn't a great start. Quiterie
  • Score: 2

8:37am Thu 24 Jul 14

LB says...

Poor governance, poor financial control and now poor teaching practice.

How much public money is going to fund this privately owned school?
Poor governance, poor financial control and now poor teaching practice. How much public money is going to fund this privately owned school? LB
  • Score: -6

9:33am Thu 24 Jul 14

ThinkBrighton says...

This is the school that is moving to the new build school at Hove Park,
is it going to be another waste of the taxpayers money
This is the school that is moving to the new build school at Hove Park, is it going to be another waste of the taxpayers money ThinkBrighton
  • Score: -3

9:45am Thu 24 Jul 14

Tel Scoomer says...

A friend has a child at the school and has been amazed at how well they've done - in English and Spanish. I went to one of their planning consultations and the parents there were also impressed at their children's progress. Parents are quick to kick off if their kids don't seem to be doing as well as they should.
I've just looked at the report itself and it appears to contain contradictions - about how safe the children are, for example. Why is is a problem that children hear Spanish and English side by side in a bilingual school? They're 4 to 7. How many teenagers in Brighton and Hove do you know who have any meaningful grasp of a foreign language?
Laughably, the Ofsted inpsector makes a basic spelling mistake in English when trying to say the teaching of Spanish isn't well thought out. Perhaps the inspector could concentrate harder on her own standard of English. It requires improvement!
A friend has a child at the school and has been amazed at how well they've done - in English and Spanish. I went to one of their planning consultations and the parents there were also impressed at their children's progress. Parents are quick to kick off if their kids don't seem to be doing as well as they should. I've just looked at the report itself and it appears to contain contradictions - about how safe the children are, for example. Why is is a problem that children hear Spanish and English side by side in a bilingual school? They're 4 to 7. How many teenagers in Brighton and Hove do you know who have any meaningful grasp of a foreign language? Laughably, the Ofsted inpsector makes a basic spelling mistake in English when trying to say the teaching of Spanish isn't well thought out. Perhaps the inspector could concentrate harder on her own standard of English. It requires improvement! Tel Scoomer
  • Score: 17

9:57am Thu 24 Jul 14

JulesB2 says...

It is a shame that the school and the children who go there and are thriving there are being used as pawns in political point scoring. Most schools don't make the press if they get a "needs improvement" ofsted judgement (it used to be satisfactory) but this one has (a) because it is a free school and some people are ideologically opposed to them and (b) because some people in the city aren't happy that the new site will be next to Hove Park. The majority of parents I know whose kids actually go to the school are pleased that their children are very happy there and they feel that their children are making good progress across the curriculum including Spanish, despite what ofsted says. That said, of course the school needs to swallow the judgement, move on, improve and hopefully get a "good" from ofsted next time.
It is a shame that the school and the children who go there and are thriving there are being used as pawns in political point scoring. Most schools don't make the press if they get a "needs improvement" ofsted judgement (it used to be satisfactory) but this one has (a) because it is a free school and some people are ideologically opposed to them and (b) because some people in the city aren't happy that the new site will be next to Hove Park. The majority of parents I know whose kids actually go to the school are pleased that their children are very happy there and they feel that their children are making good progress across the curriculum including Spanish, despite what ofsted says. That said, of course the school needs to swallow the judgement, move on, improve and hopefully get a "good" from ofsted next time. JulesB2
  • Score: 7

10:49am Thu 24 Jul 14

saveHOVE says...

If BHCC were not so desperate to liquidate what it can, as it is so cash poor, I wonder if it would have been so quick to sell publicly owned park land to the BPS before it had had its first ever OFSTED rating/report and in spite of their Education Funding Agency (EFA) bosses giving them TWO critical reports before the sale was agreed at Policy & Resources.

The first was in July 2013 and BPS failed to act on demands made by the EFA. This was made plain in the 2nd report this spring.

A third EFA report is expected this month in the wake of the 2nd one.

It seems irresponsible to allow the BPS to expand into new premises when it is not yet properly organised and indeed seems perilously close to being in deep trouble both with the EFA and with OFSTED.

What changes do they plan to have in place by September to reassure parents who think choosing this school for their kids is a wise choice?
If BHCC were not so desperate to liquidate what it can, as it is so cash poor, I wonder if it would have been so quick to sell publicly owned park land to the BPS before it had had its first ever OFSTED rating/report and in spite of their Education Funding Agency (EFA) bosses giving them TWO critical reports before the sale was agreed at Policy & Resources. The first was in July 2013 and BPS failed to act on demands made by the EFA. This was made plain in the 2nd report this spring. A third EFA report is expected this month in the wake of the 2nd one. It seems irresponsible to allow the BPS to expand into new premises when it is not yet properly organised and indeed seems perilously close to being in deep trouble both with the EFA and with OFSTED. What changes do they plan to have in place by September to reassure parents who think choosing this school for their kids is a wise choice? saveHOVE
  • Score: -15

12:18pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Amber girl says...

As a parent of a student attending this school, I am very impressed with the level of teaching and the progress my child has made. After only starting a few months ago my child now has a very wide range of Spanish vocabulary. My child's reading levels are well above average (they were below average when starting at the school). The school has excellent teaching ratios and most importantly the children are happy and love going to school. I feel there should be a separate rating criteria for free schools which ask questions like is the school doing what it set out to do? Are parents happy with the level of education that their children are receiving? Personally I think the answer to these questions is yes! I am also confident that they are making the necessary changes and improvements as requested by OFSTED.
As a parent of a student attending this school, I am very impressed with the level of teaching and the progress my child has made. After only starting a few months ago my child now has a very wide range of Spanish vocabulary. My child's reading levels are well above average (they were below average when starting at the school). The school has excellent teaching ratios and most importantly the children are happy and love going to school. I feel there should be a separate rating criteria for free schools which ask questions like is the school doing what it set out to do? Are parents happy with the level of education that their children are receiving? Personally I think the answer to these questions is yes! I am also confident that they are making the necessary changes and improvements as requested by OFSTED. Amber girl
  • Score: 4

12:22pm Thu 24 Jul 14

stevo!! . says...

Ofsted reports mean nothing. I was taught in a school marked down as 'Poor' and I loved it there.
Ofsted reports mean nothing. I was taught in a school marked down as 'Poor' and I loved it there. stevo!! .
  • Score: -2

12:38pm Thu 24 Jul 14

FatherTed11 says...

Surely there's a difference between 'failing to impress inspectors' and being 'slammed' ?
Surely there's a difference between 'failing to impress inspectors' and being 'slammed' ? FatherTed11
  • Score: 12

1:20pm Thu 24 Jul 14

kiddkoala says...

ThinkBrighton wrote:
This is the school that is moving to the new build school at Hove Park,
is it going to be another waste of the taxpayers money
Nope it certainly won't be. What the school has achieved so far whilst having to deal with premises issues (and lack of community support) have been amazing. Being a free school does not mean that everyone is free to publicly voice their negative uninformed opinions about it.
People to need to find the facts, understand the way it works and embrace it. The children are, and have benefited for doing so. The parents confidence in the school to provide an excellent education for their children says it all.
Does it need to improve, of course it does in a number of areas and I believe the plans in place following on from the Ofsted report will help to iron them out.
[quote][p][bold]ThinkBrighton[/bold] wrote: This is the school that is moving to the new build school at Hove Park, is it going to be another waste of the taxpayers money[/p][/quote]Nope it certainly won't be. What the school has achieved so far whilst having to deal with premises issues (and lack of community support) have been amazing. Being a free school does not mean that everyone is free to publicly voice their negative uninformed opinions about it. People to need to find the facts, understand the way it works and embrace it. The children are, and have benefited for doing so. The parents confidence in the school to provide an excellent education for their children says it all. Does it need to improve, of course it does in a number of areas and I believe the plans in place following on from the Ofsted report will help to iron them out. kiddkoala
  • Score: 8

1:21pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Hove_Hilary says...

My son attends this school and I am delighted with the progress he has made in both English and Spanish , being way above national average level in reading and maths .
I care not for the views of Valerie Paynter nor the biased reporting of The Argus .
My child is happy , progressing well and enjoying learning at this school . This is the only thing that matters to me .
My son attends this school and I am delighted with the progress he has made in both English and Spanish , being way above national average level in reading and maths . I care not for the views of Valerie Paynter nor the biased reporting of The Argus . My child is happy , progressing well and enjoying learning at this school . This is the only thing that matters to me . Hove_Hilary
  • Score: 12

1:35pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Ceegeeem says...

Slammed? I don't think so. Yes there are improvements to be made, but what school that's been running only 2 years wouldn't. I think this 'newspaper' has an agenda against the school which has been quite apparent since it was announced that we might be building a school in hove park.

My daughter has just finished her first year in the school and she is now able to converse in Spanish. I've seen her language skills increase 100% aside from that she absolutely loves going there and is disappointed she won't be going for another 6 weeks.

Brighton is a multicultural, cosmopolitan city with a very inclusive friendly and tolerant atmosphere it's a shame the local rag doesn't reflect the attitudes of most of it's residents.
Slammed? I don't think so. Yes there are improvements to be made, but what school that's been running only 2 years wouldn't. I think this 'newspaper' has an agenda against the school which has been quite apparent since it was announced that we might be building a school in hove park. My daughter has just finished her first year in the school and she is now able to converse in Spanish. I've seen her language skills increase 100% aside from that she absolutely loves going there and is disappointed she won't be going for another 6 weeks. Brighton is a multicultural, cosmopolitan city with a very inclusive friendly and tolerant atmosphere it's a shame the local rag doesn't reflect the attitudes of most of it's residents. Ceegeeem
  • Score: 10

1:41pm Thu 24 Jul 14

brightonbelle74 says...

The thing I can't understand is, if the level of teaching was described as being “not consistently good enough”, then how is it that inspectors praised standards that were "above those typical for pupils’ ages"??

Children aren't born with an innate ability to read and write so surely the teachers are doing something right??!
The thing I can't understand is, if the level of teaching was described as being “not consistently good enough”, then how is it that inspectors praised standards that were "above those typical for pupils’ ages"?? Children aren't born with an innate ability to read and write so surely the teachers are doing something right??! brightonbelle74
  • Score: 14

1:52pm Thu 24 Jul 14

rolivan says...

Is it totally bilingual in that it has teachers teaching Spanish in the Mother tongue and English Teachers teaching English in the Mother tongue . Our Daughter goes to School here in France and is taught English by Teachers that speak with a French accent so more often than not helps out . On the positive side She is learning French and being taught by a French Teacher.
Is it totally bilingual in that it has teachers teaching Spanish in the Mother tongue and English Teachers teaching English in the Mother tongue . Our Daughter goes to School here in France and is taught English by Teachers that speak with a French accent so more often than not helps out . On the positive side She is learning French and being taught by a French Teacher. rolivan
  • Score: 1

1:53pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Quiterie says...

brightonbelle74 wrote:
The thing I can't understand is, if the level of teaching was described as being “not consistently good enough”, then how is it that inspectors praised standards that were "above those typical for pupils’ ages"??

Children aren't born with an innate ability to read and write so surely the teachers are doing something right??!
Good question. The children at this school enter the school with above average ability - hence the inspectors comment about "above those typical for pupils’ ages" . But the focus these days (and rightly so) is on the progress made whilst at the school. The inspectors (rightly or wrongly) found that this wasn't good enough (even though the children were still above average).

This was the inspector's comment.... "Pupils do not achieve as well as they should given their starting points."

Hope this helps.
[quote][p][bold]brightonbelle74[/bold] wrote: The thing I can't understand is, if the level of teaching was described as being “not consistently good enough”, then how is it that inspectors praised standards that were "above those typical for pupils’ ages"?? Children aren't born with an innate ability to read and write so surely the teachers are doing something right??![/p][/quote]Good question. The children at this school enter the school with above average ability - hence the inspectors comment about "above those typical for pupils’ ages" . But the focus these days (and rightly so) is on the progress made whilst at the school. The inspectors (rightly or wrongly) found that this wasn't good enough (even though the children were still above average). This was the inspector's comment.... "Pupils do not achieve as well as they should given their starting points." Hope this helps. Quiterie
  • Score: 4

1:59pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Quiterie says...

Amber girl wrote:
As a parent of a student attending this school, I am very impressed with the level of teaching and the progress my child has made. After only starting a few months ago my child now has a very wide range of Spanish vocabulary. My child's reading levels are well above average (they were below average when starting at the school). The school has excellent teaching ratios and most importantly the children are happy and love going to school. I feel there should be a separate rating criteria for free schools which ask questions like is the school doing what it set out to do? Are parents happy with the level of education that their children are receiving? Personally I think the answer to these questions is yes! I am also confident that they are making the necessary changes and improvements as requested by OFSTED.
Nooooooooooooo!!!!!!
!!!! The last thing we want is a "a separate rating criteria for free schools". These are taxpayer funded schools and should have exactly the same rigour as 'normal' schools. The ethos might be different, but the aim of all schools should be to ensure that all children (regardless of ability) achieve their full potential. This is essentially what Ofsted judge.

If you remove free schools from the normal inspection routine you'll do the children who attend them a disservice and there's a real danger that when they move onto secondary school they'll be at a disadvantage to the other children.
[quote][p][bold]Amber girl[/bold] wrote: As a parent of a student attending this school, I am very impressed with the level of teaching and the progress my child has made. After only starting a few months ago my child now has a very wide range of Spanish vocabulary. My child's reading levels are well above average (they were below average when starting at the school). The school has excellent teaching ratios and most importantly the children are happy and love going to school. I feel there should be a separate rating criteria for free schools which ask questions like is the school doing what it set out to do? Are parents happy with the level of education that their children are receiving? Personally I think the answer to these questions is yes! I am also confident that they are making the necessary changes and improvements as requested by OFSTED.[/p][/quote]Nooooooooooooo!!!!!! !!!! The last thing we want is a "a separate rating criteria for free schools". These are taxpayer funded schools and should have exactly the same rigour as 'normal' schools. The ethos might be different, but the aim of all schools should be to ensure that all children (regardless of ability) achieve their full potential. This is essentially what Ofsted judge. If you remove free schools from the normal inspection routine you'll do the children who attend them a disservice and there's a real danger that when they move onto secondary school they'll be at a disadvantage to the other children. Quiterie
  • Score: 11

2:41pm Thu 24 Jul 14

I'vegotanopiniontoo says...

saveHOVE wrote:
If BHCC were not so desperate to liquidate what it can, as it is so cash poor, I wonder if it would have been so quick to sell publicly owned park land to the BPS before it had had its first ever OFSTED rating/report and in spite of their Education Funding Agency (EFA) bosses giving them TWO critical reports before the sale was agreed at Policy & Resources.

The first was in July 2013 and BPS failed to act on demands made by the EFA. This was made plain in the 2nd report this spring.

A third EFA report is expected this month in the wake of the 2nd one.

It seems irresponsible to allow the BPS to expand into new premises when it is not yet properly organised and indeed seems perilously close to being in deep trouble both with the EFA and with OFSTED.

What changes do they plan to have in place by September to reassure parents who think choosing this school for their kids is a wise choice?
@saveHove

If you want to know the facts about the school, why not ask them . Brighton as a city excels in unique opportunities, that's what makes it special.

So people make a mistake, it happens, what is factual is that the education of the children at the school has not suffered whatsoever.

Yes, I'm a parent there and couldn't be more pleased with my 4 year old's first year. Sure there have been guidelines that haven't been followed, but who's to say that those guidelines are correct, or even in date, perhaps you could enlighten me to when they were produced. Finally for your information, the school held a meeting about the OFSTED report for existing and new parents where there was no outcry.

Finally and maybe a point to remember, is that any schools OFSTED report is only as good as its last one. I hope your outcry will be in the same nature for all the other schools in the area, but I doubt it.
[quote][p][bold]saveHOVE[/bold] wrote: If BHCC were not so desperate to liquidate what it can, as it is so cash poor, I wonder if it would have been so quick to sell publicly owned park land to the BPS before it had had its first ever OFSTED rating/report and in spite of their Education Funding Agency (EFA) bosses giving them TWO critical reports before the sale was agreed at Policy & Resources. The first was in July 2013 and BPS failed to act on demands made by the EFA. This was made plain in the 2nd report this spring. A third EFA report is expected this month in the wake of the 2nd one. It seems irresponsible to allow the BPS to expand into new premises when it is not yet properly organised and indeed seems perilously close to being in deep trouble both with the EFA and with OFSTED. What changes do they plan to have in place by September to reassure parents who think choosing this school for their kids is a wise choice?[/p][/quote]@saveHove If you want to know the facts about the school, why not ask them . Brighton as a city excels in unique opportunities, that's what makes it special. So people make a mistake, it happens, what is factual is that the education of the children at the school has not suffered whatsoever. Yes, I'm a parent there and couldn't be more pleased with my 4 year old's first year. Sure there have been guidelines that haven't been followed, but who's to say that those guidelines are correct, or even in date, perhaps you could enlighten me to when they were produced. Finally for your information, the school held a meeting about the OFSTED report for existing and new parents where there was no outcry. Finally and maybe a point to remember, is that any schools OFSTED report is only as good as its last one. I hope your outcry will be in the same nature for all the other schools in the area, but I doubt it. I'vegotanopiniontoo
  • Score: 8

3:26pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Tel Scoomer says...

Amber girl wrote:
As a parent of a student attending this school, I am very impressed with the level of teaching and the progress my child has made. After only starting a few months ago my child now has a very wide range of Spanish vocabulary. My child's reading levels are well above average (they were below average when starting at the school). The school has excellent teaching ratios and most importantly the children are happy and love going to school. I feel there should be a separate rating criteria for free schools which ask questions like is the school doing what it set out to do? Are parents happy with the level of education that their children are receiving? Personally I think the answer to these questions is yes! I am also confident that they are making the necessary changes and improvements as requested by OFSTED.
The comments from parents here are consistent with those I have heard from parents. The children are happy, safe and making excellent progress. The evaluation of their Spanish ability looks to have been an Ofsted **** up.
I disagree about the need for a separate inspection regime for free schools. It shouldn't matter what type of school it is when it comes to measuring standards. Perhaps there should be some allowance made for being such a new school but even there I have my reservations.
There is a case for asking whether Ofsted is up to the job. We have slipped down the international league tables under the current regime. Is it an effective way of checking and raising standards? It doesn't appear to be. Perhaps it is Ofsted itself that requires improvement.
[quote][p][bold]Amber girl[/bold] wrote: As a parent of a student attending this school, I am very impressed with the level of teaching and the progress my child has made. After only starting a few months ago my child now has a very wide range of Spanish vocabulary. My child's reading levels are well above average (they were below average when starting at the school). The school has excellent teaching ratios and most importantly the children are happy and love going to school. I feel there should be a separate rating criteria for free schools which ask questions like is the school doing what it set out to do? Are parents happy with the level of education that their children are receiving? Personally I think the answer to these questions is yes! I am also confident that they are making the necessary changes and improvements as requested by OFSTED.[/p][/quote]The comments from parents here are consistent with those I have heard from parents. The children are happy, safe and making excellent progress. The evaluation of their Spanish ability looks to have been an Ofsted **** up. I disagree about the need for a separate inspection regime for free schools. It shouldn't matter what type of school it is when it comes to measuring standards. Perhaps there should be some allowance made for being such a new school but even there I have my reservations. There is a case for asking whether Ofsted is up to the job. We have slipped down the international league tables under the current regime. Is it an effective way of checking and raising standards? It doesn't appear to be. Perhaps it is Ofsted itself that requires improvement. Tel Scoomer
  • Score: 3

3:57pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Fred Long says...

Tel Scoomer is spot in. I also know the parents of a child at the school and I went to the consultation meetings about the plans for the new premises.
It is not, as one commenter said, a private school. It is a state school albeit one that reports to a quango not a council.
The parents I know have spoken highly of the standards of education, behaviour and expectations. They said that Spanish took second place because the school follows the National Curriculum and yet their child has a rapidly growing vocabulary and confidence at a remarkably young age. And takes absolute pleasure in being able to speak in both English and Spanish.
Given the coverage of the school's planning application as well, The Argus increasingly looks as though it has some kind of axe to grind here.
I would sooner take the recommendation of aspirational and fussy parents over Ofsted any day.
Did the inspectors have a bad day at the office?
Tel Scoomer is spot in. I also know the parents of a child at the school and I went to the consultation meetings about the plans for the new premises. It is not, as one commenter said, a private school. It is a state school albeit one that reports to a quango not a council. The parents I know have spoken highly of the standards of education, behaviour and expectations. They said that Spanish took second place because the school follows the National Curriculum and yet their child has a rapidly growing vocabulary and confidence at a remarkably young age. And takes absolute pleasure in being able to speak in both English and Spanish. Given the coverage of the school's planning application as well, The Argus increasingly looks as though it has some kind of axe to grind here. I would sooner take the recommendation of aspirational and fussy parents over Ofsted any day. Did the inspectors have a bad day at the office? Fred Long
  • Score: 8

4:03pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Fred Long says...

I meant spot on - not spot in!
I meant spot on - not spot in! Fred Long
  • Score: 1

6:18pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Kristina2 says...

I don't think requires improvement is bad news for the school which opened its doors for children two years ago. Those who work in education know how much work it involves to establish a school. As a parent of a child in Year 2 I am happy with the verdict as I know the school will do their best to improve as the head teacher promised. My daughter joined the school in Year 1 as a child below average in reading and writing. She sat her SATs this year and got above average in reading, writing and maths. She watches cartoons, reads, writes and speaks in Spanish with our Spanish speaking friends even though no one at our home does. At the age of 7 she might not be bilingual but she is able to communicate and I would even risk a statement she would soon be ready to take her GCSE in Spanish if they were designed for 7 years old. The school attracts so much publicity but not much interest in what students and parents think.
I don't think requires improvement is bad news for the school which opened its doors for children two years ago. Those who work in education know how much work it involves to establish a school. As a parent of a child in Year 2 I am happy with the verdict as I know the school will do their best to improve as the head teacher promised. My daughter joined the school in Year 1 as a child below average in reading and writing. She sat her SATs this year and got above average in reading, writing and maths. She watches cartoons, reads, writes and speaks in Spanish with our Spanish speaking friends even though no one at our home does. At the age of 7 she might not be bilingual but she is able to communicate and I would even risk a statement she would soon be ready to take her GCSE in Spanish if they were designed for 7 years old. The school attracts so much publicity but not much interest in what students and parents think. Kristina2
  • Score: 4

7:40pm Thu 24 Jul 14

pebble counter says...

Tel Scoomer wrote:
A friend has a child at the school and has been amazed at how well they've done - in English and Spanish. I went to one of their planning consultations and the parents there were also impressed at their children's progress. Parents are quick to kick off if their kids don't seem to be doing as well as they should.
I've just looked at the report itself and it appears to contain contradictions - about how safe the children are, for example. Why is is a problem that children hear Spanish and English side by side in a bilingual school? They're 4 to 7. How many teenagers in Brighton and Hove do you know who have any meaningful grasp of a foreign language?
Laughably, the Ofsted inpsector makes a basic spelling mistake in English when trying to say the teaching of Spanish isn't well thought out. Perhaps the inspector could concentrate harder on her own standard of English. It requires improvement!
See me.
[quote][p][bold]Tel Scoomer[/bold] wrote: A friend has a child at the school and has been amazed at how well they've done - in English and Spanish. I went to one of their planning consultations and the parents there were also impressed at their children's progress. Parents are quick to kick off if their kids don't seem to be doing as well as they should. I've just looked at the report itself and it appears to contain contradictions - about how safe the children are, for example. Why is is a problem that children hear Spanish and English side by side in a bilingual school? They're 4 to 7. How many teenagers in Brighton and Hove do you know who have any meaningful grasp of a foreign language? Laughably, the Ofsted inpsector makes a basic spelling mistake in English when trying to say the teaching of Spanish isn't well thought out. Perhaps the inspector could concentrate harder on her own standard of English. It requires improvement![/p][/quote]See me. pebble counter
  • Score: 0

7:54pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Kristina2 says...

Quiterie wrote:
The first thing to do when you receive a poor Ofsted is accept the findings and try and move on, implementing measures to address the issues raised in the report.

This headteacher is obviously still in denial that anything is wrong. If you read the full report the inspectors are very specific about where improvements need to be made. Ofsted take a pretty dim view of schools that don't accept their findings.

Saying things like "our pupils outperform normal students by 20% in some cases" is meaningless. The report makes it very clear that more able pupils are not being stretched for example.

The report also mentions that teachers say things in Spanish and then English and because the children know that the English translation is coming up they don't listen to the Spanish. When the children speak in Spanish they only use one or two words. So no real 'mystery' there as the school claims.

As this school is getting so much public money I hope it succeeds, but this isn't a great start.
I agree that the school needs to address the issues raised in the report and I understood from the meeting with the head teacher they would. However, I was surprised with some findings of OFSTED as well. My child went from being below average in Year 1 to above average in Year 2. Also she must be frustrated with me when I keep asking her if she really understands that much when she interacts with cartoons she watches, reads or speaks Spanish. From my experience as a teacher of foreign languages and a mother of already bilingual child understanding comes first than speaking full sentences. Also having a few Spanish speaking children and majority of children who don't know any Spanish is a challenge in a very small school.. Being interesred in bilingualism I can't wait to learn what sugestions of improvement OFSTED has got regarding Spanish as the UK hasn't got much experience with bilingual primary schools and happy to know the school will be improving as it's in my childs best interest.
[quote][p][bold]Quiterie[/bold] wrote: The first thing to do when you receive a poor Ofsted is accept the findings and try and move on, implementing measures to address the issues raised in the report. This headteacher is obviously still in denial that anything is wrong. If you read the full report the inspectors are very specific about where improvements need to be made. Ofsted take a pretty dim view of schools that don't accept their findings. Saying things like "our pupils outperform normal students by 20% in some cases" is meaningless. The report makes it very clear that more able pupils are not being stretched for example. The report also mentions that teachers say things in Spanish and then English and because the children know that the English translation is coming up they don't listen to the Spanish. When the children speak in Spanish they only use one or two words. So no real 'mystery' there as the school claims. As this school is getting so much public money I hope it succeeds, but this isn't a great start.[/p][/quote]I agree that the school needs to address the issues raised in the report and I understood from the meeting with the head teacher they would. However, I was surprised with some findings of OFSTED as well. My child went from being below average in Year 1 to above average in Year 2. Also she must be frustrated with me when I keep asking her if she really understands that much when she interacts with cartoons she watches, reads or speaks Spanish. From my experience as a teacher of foreign languages and a mother of already bilingual child understanding comes first than speaking full sentences. Also having a few Spanish speaking children and majority of children who don't know any Spanish is a challenge in a very small school.. Being interesred in bilingualism I can't wait to learn what sugestions of improvement OFSTED has got regarding Spanish as the UK hasn't got much experience with bilingual primary schools and happy to know the school will be improving as it's in my childs best interest. Kristina2
  • Score: 4

9:42pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Maxwell's Ghost says...

I have worked all over the world including South America and in the past decade the number of people now speaking fluent English in these countries from a very young age and even choosing it as their first language has rocketed due to technology and English and American TV/music being available in youth culture via the internet.
Therefore, parents in the UK would be better focusing on the poor English grammar and maths skills of their children which fall way behind overseas students.
We are now bringing Chinese teachers into classrooms to teach UK kids maths.
Stop messing about in fanciful teaching and get your kids ready for the global job market. You would probably be better off teaching them to drive. I wasted years at school learning languages. Nice as a hobby but improving my maths and economics would have been far more useful in the business world.
I have worked all over the world including South America and in the past decade the number of people now speaking fluent English in these countries from a very young age and even choosing it as their first language has rocketed due to technology and English and American TV/music being available in youth culture via the internet. Therefore, parents in the UK would be better focusing on the poor English grammar and maths skills of their children which fall way behind overseas students. We are now bringing Chinese teachers into classrooms to teach UK kids maths. Stop messing about in fanciful teaching and get your kids ready for the global job market. You would probably be better off teaching them to drive. I wasted years at school learning languages. Nice as a hobby but improving my maths and economics would have been far more useful in the business world. Maxwell's Ghost
  • Score: -6

11:32pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Cave Johnson says...

Tel Scoomer wrote:
A friend has a child at the school and has been amazed at how well they've done - in English and Spanish. I went to one of their planning consultations and the parents there were also impressed at their children's progress. Parents are quick to kick off if their kids don't seem to be doing as well as they should.
I've just looked at the report itself and it appears to contain contradictions - about how safe the children are, for example. Why is is a problem that children hear Spanish and English side by side in a bilingual school? They're 4 to 7. How many teenagers in Brighton and Hove do you know who have any meaningful grasp of a foreign language?
Laughably, the Ofsted inpsector makes a basic spelling mistake in English when trying to say the teaching of Spanish isn't well thought out. Perhaps the inspector could concentrate harder on her own standard of English. It requires improvement!
A typo and a spelling mistake are two different things. Or can I assume that from the sentence 'Why is is a problem' that you cannot spell the word 'it'?
[quote][p][bold]Tel Scoomer[/bold] wrote: A friend has a child at the school and has been amazed at how well they've done - in English and Spanish. I went to one of their planning consultations and the parents there were also impressed at their children's progress. Parents are quick to kick off if their kids don't seem to be doing as well as they should. I've just looked at the report itself and it appears to contain contradictions - about how safe the children are, for example. Why is is a problem that children hear Spanish and English side by side in a bilingual school? They're 4 to 7. How many teenagers in Brighton and Hove do you know who have any meaningful grasp of a foreign language? Laughably, the Ofsted inpsector makes a basic spelling mistake in English when trying to say the teaching of Spanish isn't well thought out. Perhaps the inspector could concentrate harder on her own standard of English. It requires improvement![/p][/quote]A typo and a spelling mistake are two different things. Or can I assume that from the sentence 'Why is is a problem' that you cannot spell the word 'it'? Cave Johnson
  • Score: -10

7:22am Fri 25 Jul 14

Schoolwatch2014 says...

Is this just another case of Teflon shoulders, disinformation and deflection by Carolina Gopal? If you look at the information the school provides, it follows the Early Years Foundation Scheme in addition to the National Curriculum so there IS a framework that it can be evaluated on. What’s more the current Ofsted dashboard shows that no testing whatsoever has taken place in national tests so where is she getting the data to prove that the pupils results are above average? Internal facts based on their own opinions for which the leadership has been criticised for being “too positive” about its abilities? The report shows that it cannot even get what it is supposed to be good at right and that is bilingualism. It is teaching Spanish as an additional language given the assessment methods Gopal believes would have proven the pupils’ ability to the inspectors, not promoting bilingualism that fluent usage in each language would show automatically even after a short period of 2 years. true bilingualism teaches in both languages equally.
The school has had 2 years to get its teaching right and it’s model of bilingual education and Ofsted has now shown that it can do neither. As an academy it is up to the bilingual school to decide what should be given “primacy” but clearly it isn’t on bilingualism nor on the provision of quality education
It is also worth noting that no details of what job was given up by the Chair of Governors, perhaps this is because there wasn't one and this was a way of creating income as payments to her by the school would suggest.
Is this just another case of Teflon shoulders, disinformation and deflection by Carolina Gopal? If you look at the information the school provides, it follows the Early Years Foundation Scheme in addition to the National Curriculum so there IS a framework that it can be evaluated on. What’s more the current Ofsted dashboard shows that no testing whatsoever has taken place in national tests so where is she getting the data to prove that the pupils results are above average? Internal facts based on their own opinions for which the leadership has been criticised for being “too positive” about its abilities? The report shows that it cannot even get what it is supposed to be good at right and that is bilingualism. It is teaching Spanish as an additional language given the assessment methods Gopal believes would have proven the pupils’ ability to the inspectors, not promoting bilingualism that fluent usage in each language would show automatically even after a short period of 2 years. true bilingualism teaches in both languages equally. The school has had 2 years to get its teaching right and it’s model of bilingual education and Ofsted has now shown that it can do neither. As an academy it is up to the bilingual school to decide what should be given “primacy” but clearly it isn’t on bilingualism nor on the provision of quality education It is also worth noting that no details of what job was given up by the Chair of Governors, perhaps this is because there wasn't one and this was a way of creating income as payments to her by the school would suggest. Schoolwatch2014
  • Score: -8

9:19am Fri 25 Jul 14

Kristina2 says...

Maxwell's Ghost wrote:
I have worked all over the world including South America and in the past decade the number of people now speaking fluent English in these countries from a very young age and even choosing it as their first language has rocketed due to technology and English and American TV/music being available in youth culture via the internet.
Therefore, parents in the UK would be better focusing on the poor English grammar and maths skills of their children which fall way behind overseas students.
We are now bringing Chinese teachers into classrooms to teach UK kids maths.
Stop messing about in fanciful teaching and get your kids ready for the global job market. You would probably be better off teaching them to drive. I wasted years at school learning languages. Nice as a hobby but improving my maths and economics would have been far more useful in the business world.
Being interested in bilingualism and having a child who is bilingual I read lots articles and scientists prove that learning languages at the early stages of your life boost maths skills. Maybe if you had given more attention to learning languages your maths skills would be much better. Fair enough you were not given a chance to learn them early at school. Have you ever heard about langusge immersion. It's lots of fun! More than half of the world's population is bilingual. As a businessman you know that every skill counts and all over the world including Brighton being multilingual gives you more job opportunities.
[quote][p][bold]Maxwell's Ghost[/bold] wrote: I have worked all over the world including South America and in the past decade the number of people now speaking fluent English in these countries from a very young age and even choosing it as their first language has rocketed due to technology and English and American TV/music being available in youth culture via the internet. Therefore, parents in the UK would be better focusing on the poor English grammar and maths skills of their children which fall way behind overseas students. We are now bringing Chinese teachers into classrooms to teach UK kids maths. Stop messing about in fanciful teaching and get your kids ready for the global job market. You would probably be better off teaching them to drive. I wasted years at school learning languages. Nice as a hobby but improving my maths and economics would have been far more useful in the business world.[/p][/quote]Being interested in bilingualism and having a child who is bilingual I read lots articles and scientists prove that learning languages at the early stages of your life boost maths skills. Maybe if you had given more attention to learning languages your maths skills would be much better. Fair enough you were not given a chance to learn them early at school. Have you ever heard about langusge immersion. It's lots of fun! More than half of the world's population is bilingual. As a businessman you know that every skill counts and all over the world including Brighton being multilingual gives you more job opportunities. Kristina2
  • Score: 4

9:30am Fri 25 Jul 14

Kristina2 says...

Schoolwatch2014 wrote:
Is this just another case of Teflon shoulders, disinformation and deflection by Carolina Gopal? If you look at the information the school provides, it follows the Early Years Foundation Scheme in addition to the National Curriculum so there IS a framework that it can be evaluated on. What’s more the current Ofsted dashboard shows that no testing whatsoever has taken place in national tests so where is she getting the data to prove that the pupils results are above average? Internal facts based on their own opinions for which the leadership has been criticised for being “too positive” about its abilities? The report shows that it cannot even get what it is supposed to be good at right and that is bilingualism. It is teaching Spanish as an additional language given the assessment methods Gopal believes would have proven the pupils’ ability to the inspectors, not promoting bilingualism that fluent usage in each language would show automatically even after a short period of 2 years. true bilingualism teaches in both languages equally.
The school has had 2 years to get its teaching right and it’s model of bilingual education and Ofsted has now shown that it can do neither. As an academy it is up to the bilingual school to decide what should be given “primacy” but clearly it isn’t on bilingualism nor on the provision of quality education
It is also worth noting that no details of what job was given up by the Chair of Governors, perhaps this is because there wasn't one and this was a way of creating income as payments to her by the school would suggest.
I am very happy to meet you together with my daugher who is seven and she would be more than happy to read to you in Spanish, write you a note or converse in Spanish. You may bring along a Spanish friend if you have one. She would also be able to explain how she learnt her Spanish.
[quote][p][bold]Schoolwatch2014[/bold] wrote: Is this just another case of Teflon shoulders, disinformation and deflection by Carolina Gopal? If you look at the information the school provides, it follows the Early Years Foundation Scheme in addition to the National Curriculum so there IS a framework that it can be evaluated on. What’s more the current Ofsted dashboard shows that no testing whatsoever has taken place in national tests so where is she getting the data to prove that the pupils results are above average? Internal facts based on their own opinions for which the leadership has been criticised for being “too positive” about its abilities? The report shows that it cannot even get what it is supposed to be good at right and that is bilingualism. It is teaching Spanish as an additional language given the assessment methods Gopal believes would have proven the pupils’ ability to the inspectors, not promoting bilingualism that fluent usage in each language would show automatically even after a short period of 2 years. true bilingualism teaches in both languages equally. The school has had 2 years to get its teaching right and it’s model of bilingual education and Ofsted has now shown that it can do neither. As an academy it is up to the bilingual school to decide what should be given “primacy” but clearly it isn’t on bilingualism nor on the provision of quality education It is also worth noting that no details of what job was given up by the Chair of Governors, perhaps this is because there wasn't one and this was a way of creating income as payments to her by the school would suggest.[/p][/quote]I am very happy to meet you together with my daugher who is seven and she would be more than happy to read to you in Spanish, write you a note or converse in Spanish. You may bring along a Spanish friend if you have one. She would also be able to explain how she learnt her Spanish. Kristina2
  • Score: 3

9:38am Fri 25 Jul 14

Schoolwatch2014 says...

As lessons are taught entirely in English with separate dedicated Spanish lessons it is a very good example of learning Spanish as a second language not as a bilingual one. Bilingualism requires equal usage on both languages not just being able to read, translate or understand, which are functions of learning a language as a second language.
As lessons are taught entirely in English with separate dedicated Spanish lessons it is a very good example of learning Spanish as a second language not as a bilingual one. Bilingualism requires equal usage on both languages not just being able to read, translate or understand, which are functions of learning a language as a second language. Schoolwatch2014
  • Score: -4

11:03am Fri 25 Jul 14

Kristina2 says...

Schoolwatch2014 wrote:
As lessons are taught entirely in English with separate dedicated Spanish lessons it is a very good example of learning Spanish as a second language not as a bilingual one. Bilingualism requires equal usage on both languages not just being able to read, translate or understand, which are functions of learning a language as a second language.
Yes, the ideal solution is to have a bilingual teacher or two teachers one teaching in English and the other in Spanish. However, as this is not a private school so it doesn't have enough money to emloy two teachers. It's a small school and it gets less money than other schools as you get money per child. All over Europe schools claim to be bilingual but not necessary having equal usage on both languages especially when most of children don't speak the language. Being a teacher of foreign languages I disagree it is taught as a second language as the aquisition is far better in the case of BPS. I taught children age 7 and above a foreign language abroad for years and can see massive difference. Even if it is not fully bilingual there is not really measures of how quickly you should aquire. Even we as humans need at least two years to be able to talk. Children at school hear Spanish each day during breaks and lunchtime and during lessons. Instead of critisising why don't we give it a chance to develop and improve especially if we have got so many happy parents and kids and children who achieve.
[quote][p][bold]Schoolwatch2014[/bold] wrote: As lessons are taught entirely in English with separate dedicated Spanish lessons it is a very good example of learning Spanish as a second language not as a bilingual one. Bilingualism requires equal usage on both languages not just being able to read, translate or understand, which are functions of learning a language as a second language.[/p][/quote]Yes, the ideal solution is to have a bilingual teacher or two teachers one teaching in English and the other in Spanish. However, as this is not a private school so it doesn't have enough money to emloy two teachers. It's a small school and it gets less money than other schools as you get money per child. All over Europe schools claim to be bilingual but not necessary having equal usage on both languages especially when most of children don't speak the language. Being a teacher of foreign languages I disagree it is taught as a second language as the aquisition is far better in the case of BPS. I taught children age 7 and above a foreign language abroad for years and can see massive difference. Even if it is not fully bilingual there is not really measures of how quickly you should aquire. Even we as humans need at least two years to be able to talk. Children at school hear Spanish each day during breaks and lunchtime and during lessons. Instead of critisising why don't we give it a chance to develop and improve especially if we have got so many happy parents and kids and children who achieve. Kristina2
  • Score: 3

11:47am Fri 25 Jul 14

Ortelius says...

Schoolwatch2014 wrote:
As lessons are taught entirely in English with separate dedicated Spanish lessons it is a very good example of learning Spanish as a second language not as a bilingual one. Bilingualism requires equal usage on both languages not just being able to read, translate or understand, which are functions of learning a language as a second language.
My son has just finished year one at this school and I couldn't be happier. He's six years old and is well on his way to being bilingual, his understanding of the language is extremely good and his vocabulary is growing. It isn't true to say that lessons are taught entirely in English. The school has obviously prioritised Literacy and Maths skills in English which I'm really pleased with and learning these has helped the kids get off to a great start when compared with national target levels. Other lessons are taught in both Spanish and English and of course there are specific Spanish lessons on top of this. After school clubs etc are entirely in Spanish. It is worth remembering that there are currently only 3 year groups in the school, I expect that as the school grows the ratio of lessons taught in Spanish vs English will even out, as children will have the basic English reading and maths skills that they all need.
I have no problem with Ofsted highlighting areas for improvement based on national benchmarks, that seems healthy to me to help the school to improve. What I don't believe is fair though is to criticise language teaching where there are no national benchmarks for key stage 1 and 2 and where other schools are not being judged. I can see for myself the results and that my 6 year old is able to speak and read confidently in Spanish, how many other primary schools can claim that at the end of year one?
[quote][p][bold]Schoolwatch2014[/bold] wrote: As lessons are taught entirely in English with separate dedicated Spanish lessons it is a very good example of learning Spanish as a second language not as a bilingual one. Bilingualism requires equal usage on both languages not just being able to read, translate or understand, which are functions of learning a language as a second language.[/p][/quote]My son has just finished year one at this school and I couldn't be happier. He's six years old and is well on his way to being bilingual, his understanding of the language is extremely good and his vocabulary is growing. It isn't true to say that lessons are taught entirely in English. The school has obviously prioritised Literacy and Maths skills in English which I'm really pleased with and learning these has helped the kids get off to a great start when compared with national target levels. Other lessons are taught in both Spanish and English and of course there are specific Spanish lessons on top of this. After school clubs etc are entirely in Spanish. It is worth remembering that there are currently only 3 year groups in the school, I expect that as the school grows the ratio of lessons taught in Spanish vs English will even out, as children will have the basic English reading and maths skills that they all need. I have no problem with Ofsted highlighting areas for improvement based on national benchmarks, that seems healthy to me to help the school to improve. What I don't believe is fair though is to criticise language teaching where there are no national benchmarks for key stage 1 and 2 and where other schools are not being judged. I can see for myself the results and that my 6 year old is able to speak and read confidently in Spanish, how many other primary schools can claim that at the end of year one? Ortelius
  • Score: 4

4:27pm Fri 25 Jul 14

saveHOVE says...

Kristina2 wrote:
Schoolwatch2014 wrote:
As lessons are taught entirely in English with separate dedicated Spanish lessons it is a very good example of learning Spanish as a second language not as a bilingual one. Bilingualism requires equal usage on both languages not just being able to read, translate or understand, which are functions of learning a language as a second language.
Yes, the ideal solution is to have a bilingual teacher or two teachers one teaching in English and the other in Spanish. However, as this is not a private school so it doesn't have enough money to emloy two teachers. It's a small school and it gets less money than other schools as you get money per child. All over Europe schools claim to be bilingual but not necessary having equal usage on both languages especially when most of children don't speak the language. Being a teacher of foreign languages I disagree it is taught as a second language as the aquisition is far better in the case of BPS. I taught children age 7 and above a foreign language abroad for years and can see massive difference. Even if it is not fully bilingual there is not really measures of how quickly you should aquire. Even we as humans need at least two years to be able to talk. Children at school hear Spanish each day during breaks and lunchtime and during lessons. Instead of critisising why don't we give it a chance to develop and improve especially if we have got so many happy parents and kids and children who achieve.
You detour into language teaching as you see it and divert attention from all the other OFSTED criticisms too.

But carry on. Ignore the OFSTED and EFA criticisms and requiremens. Go your own sweet way and see where you end up.

I understand the Dept. of Education is reviewing how they run Academies/Free Schools with a view to tightening up and putting stronger controls in place - such as sacking entire boards of governors if need be and installing replacements.

I think people misinterpret the word "Free". It does not mean doing what you please. It means free from local authority control.
[quote][p][bold]Kristina2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Schoolwatch2014[/bold] wrote: As lessons are taught entirely in English with separate dedicated Spanish lessons it is a very good example of learning Spanish as a second language not as a bilingual one. Bilingualism requires equal usage on both languages not just being able to read, translate or understand, which are functions of learning a language as a second language.[/p][/quote]Yes, the ideal solution is to have a bilingual teacher or two teachers one teaching in English and the other in Spanish. However, as this is not a private school so it doesn't have enough money to emloy two teachers. It's a small school and it gets less money than other schools as you get money per child. All over Europe schools claim to be bilingual but not necessary having equal usage on both languages especially when most of children don't speak the language. Being a teacher of foreign languages I disagree it is taught as a second language as the aquisition is far better in the case of BPS. I taught children age 7 and above a foreign language abroad for years and can see massive difference. Even if it is not fully bilingual there is not really measures of how quickly you should aquire. Even we as humans need at least two years to be able to talk. Children at school hear Spanish each day during breaks and lunchtime and during lessons. Instead of critisising why don't we give it a chance to develop and improve especially if we have got so many happy parents and kids and children who achieve.[/p][/quote]You detour into language teaching as you see it and divert attention from all the other OFSTED criticisms too. But carry on. Ignore the OFSTED and EFA criticisms and requiremens. Go your own sweet way and see where you end up. I understand the Dept. of Education is reviewing how they run Academies/Free Schools with a view to tightening up and putting stronger controls in place - such as sacking entire boards of governors if need be and installing replacements. I think people misinterpret the word "Free". It does not mean doing what you please. It means free from local authority control. saveHOVE
  • Score: -3

4:31pm Fri 25 Jul 14

I'vegotanopiniontoo says...

saveHOVE wrote:
Kristina2 wrote:
Schoolwatch2014 wrote:
As lessons are taught entirely in English with separate dedicated Spanish lessons it is a very good example of learning Spanish as a second language not as a bilingual one. Bilingualism requires equal usage on both languages not just being able to read, translate or understand, which are functions of learning a language as a second language.
Yes, the ideal solution is to have a bilingual teacher or two teachers one teaching in English and the other in Spanish. However, as this is not a private school so it doesn't have enough money to emloy two teachers. It's a small school and it gets less money than other schools as you get money per child. All over Europe schools claim to be bilingual but not necessary having equal usage on both languages especially when most of children don't speak the language. Being a teacher of foreign languages I disagree it is taught as a second language as the aquisition is far better in the case of BPS. I taught children age 7 and above a foreign language abroad for years and can see massive difference. Even if it is not fully bilingual there is not really measures of how quickly you should aquire. Even we as humans need at least two years to be able to talk. Children at school hear Spanish each day during breaks and lunchtime and during lessons. Instead of critisising why don't we give it a chance to develop and improve especially if we have got so many happy parents and kids and children who achieve.
You detour into language teaching as you see it and divert attention from all the other OFSTED criticisms too.

But carry on. Ignore the OFSTED and EFA criticisms and requiremens. Go your own sweet way and see where you end up.

I understand the Dept. of Education is reviewing how they run Academies/Free Schools with a view to tightening up and putting stronger controls in place - such as sacking entire boards of governors if need be and installing replacements.

I think people misinterpret the word "Free". It does not mean doing what you please. It means free from local authority control.
Firstly. There is a "t" in the word requirements.
[quote][p][bold]saveHOVE[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Kristina2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Schoolwatch2014[/bold] wrote: As lessons are taught entirely in English with separate dedicated Spanish lessons it is a very good example of learning Spanish as a second language not as a bilingual one. Bilingualism requires equal usage on both languages not just being able to read, translate or understand, which are functions of learning a language as a second language.[/p][/quote]Yes, the ideal solution is to have a bilingual teacher or two teachers one teaching in English and the other in Spanish. However, as this is not a private school so it doesn't have enough money to emloy two teachers. It's a small school and it gets less money than other schools as you get money per child. All over Europe schools claim to be bilingual but not necessary having equal usage on both languages especially when most of children don't speak the language. Being a teacher of foreign languages I disagree it is taught as a second language as the aquisition is far better in the case of BPS. I taught children age 7 and above a foreign language abroad for years and can see massive difference. Even if it is not fully bilingual there is not really measures of how quickly you should aquire. Even we as humans need at least two years to be able to talk. Children at school hear Spanish each day during breaks and lunchtime and during lessons. Instead of critisising why don't we give it a chance to develop and improve especially if we have got so many happy parents and kids and children who achieve.[/p][/quote]You detour into language teaching as you see it and divert attention from all the other OFSTED criticisms too. But carry on. Ignore the OFSTED and EFA criticisms and requiremens. Go your own sweet way and see where you end up. I understand the Dept. of Education is reviewing how they run Academies/Free Schools with a view to tightening up and putting stronger controls in place - such as sacking entire boards of governors if need be and installing replacements. I think people misinterpret the word "Free". It does not mean doing what you please. It means free from local authority control.[/p][/quote]Firstly. There is a "t" in the word requirements. I'vegotanopiniontoo
  • Score: 3

6:01pm Fri 25 Jul 14

Schoolwatch2014 says...

The other main point parents seem to be forgetting is that this is tax payers' money being spent on a supposedly bilingual school that is not offering value for money. Since it is taxpayers' money the school needs to do more than keep parents at the school happy with the low quality education or poor financial management that it provides., as set out by 2 external government agencies. It needs to show it is doing a good job for the money that is being given; again epic fail on both counts.
The other main point parents seem to be forgetting is that this is tax payers' money being spent on a supposedly bilingual school that is not offering value for money. Since it is taxpayers' money the school needs to do more than keep parents at the school happy with the low quality education or poor financial management that it provides., as set out by 2 external government agencies. It needs to show it is doing a good job for the money that is being given; again epic fail on both counts. Schoolwatch2014
  • Score: -5

6:29pm Fri 25 Jul 14

I'vegotanopiniontoo says...

Schoolwatch2014 wrote:
The other main point parents seem to be forgetting is that this is tax payers' money being spent on a supposedly bilingual school that is not offering value for money. Since it is taxpayers' money the school needs to do more than keep parents at the school happy with the low quality education or poor financial management that it provides., as set out by 2 external government agencies. It needs to show it is doing a good job for the money that is being given; again epic fail on both counts.
@Schoolwatch2014

Seriously, climb off your soapbox and do some research. Go to the OFSTED site, download the latest report for Brighton and Hove (it's 2011, say's it all really) and read the FACTS.

Out of 54 Primary schools in BAH
33 were outstanding
35 were good
30 were satisfactory (that's the old title for whats now called Requires improvement)
and 2 Inadequate

Of course any reports only as good as it's last one so maybe you could have a comment about the other 32 schools as well, or get a bigger soapbox. Epic fail on your account really. As for taxpayers money I'm sure you'd rather divert it to other causes like creating an overseeing business like Schoolwatch, something that is apparent that you know nothing about.
[quote][p][bold]Schoolwatch2014[/bold] wrote: The other main point parents seem to be forgetting is that this is tax payers' money being spent on a supposedly bilingual school that is not offering value for money. Since it is taxpayers' money the school needs to do more than keep parents at the school happy with the low quality education or poor financial management that it provides., as set out by 2 external government agencies. It needs to show it is doing a good job for the money that is being given; again epic fail on both counts.[/p][/quote]@Schoolwatch2014 Seriously, climb off your soapbox and do some research. Go to the OFSTED site, download the latest report for Brighton and Hove (it's 2011, say's it all really) and read the FACTS. Out of 54 Primary schools in BAH 33 were outstanding 35 were good 30 were satisfactory (that's the old title for whats now called Requires improvement) and 2 Inadequate Of course any reports only as good as it's last one so maybe you could have a comment about the other 32 schools as well, or get a bigger soapbox. Epic fail on your account really. As for taxpayers money I'm sure you'd rather divert it to other causes like creating an overseeing business like Schoolwatch, something that is apparent that you know nothing about. I'vegotanopiniontoo
  • Score: 5

7:30pm Fri 25 Jul 14

saveHOVE says...

Schoolwatch2014 wrote:
The other main point parents seem to be forgetting is that this is tax payers' money being spent on a supposedly bilingual school that is not offering value for money. Since it is taxpayers' money the school needs to do more than keep parents at the school happy with the low quality education or poor financial management that it provides., as set out by 2 external government agencies. It needs to show it is doing a good job for the money that is being given; again epic fail on both counts.
If the BPS is not in control at this time how is it capable of expanding into a new school in 2015 with (expected) many more pupils? Neither EFA nor OFSTED sound one bit happy or confident BPS is honouring its remit.

Might the EFA seek reforms before implementing the consent for the new school build and parting with the cash for the site's leasehold? It seems a sensible way forward. Who will have the leasehold ownership of the Hove Park site? EFA? Dept. for Education? Who?

And should BPS end up in special measures or closing down, who then takes over the building and land? Even if they pull out of this fall from grace these contingencies should be clear.

It is ironic that the D of E solution (Academies/Free Schools) to failing schools/poor schooling from local authorities is in too many cases no better.
[quote][p][bold]Schoolwatch2014[/bold] wrote: The other main point parents seem to be forgetting is that this is tax payers' money being spent on a supposedly bilingual school that is not offering value for money. Since it is taxpayers' money the school needs to do more than keep parents at the school happy with the low quality education or poor financial management that it provides., as set out by 2 external government agencies. It needs to show it is doing a good job for the money that is being given; again epic fail on both counts.[/p][/quote]If the BPS is not in control at this time how is it capable of expanding into a new school in 2015 with (expected) many more pupils? Neither EFA nor OFSTED sound one bit happy or confident BPS is honouring its remit. Might the EFA seek reforms before implementing the consent for the new school build and parting with the cash for the site's leasehold? It seems a sensible way forward. Who will have the leasehold ownership of the Hove Park site? EFA? Dept. for Education? Who? And should BPS end up in special measures or closing down, who then takes over the building and land? Even if they pull out of this fall from grace these contingencies should be clear. It is ironic that the D of E solution (Academies/Free Schools) to failing schools/poor schooling from local authorities is in too many cases no better. saveHOVE
  • Score: -7

9:55pm Fri 25 Jul 14

Ortelius says...

There are good plans in place to help the school continue to improve and they should be encouraged to do that. There seem a number of people commenting here who are almost willing it to fail. How sick is that? What does that do for the children and families in the city or for taxpayers for that matter? ... also what is "Schoolwatch2014" all about .... sinister and weird.
There are good plans in place to help the school continue to improve and they should be encouraged to do that. There seem a number of people commenting here who are almost willing it to fail. How sick is that? What does that do for the children and families in the city or for taxpayers for that matter? ... also what is "Schoolwatch2014" all about .... sinister and weird. Ortelius
  • Score: 6

5:14am Sat 26 Jul 14

Schoolwatch2014 says...

@ ivegotanopiniontoo. Maybe it's a provincial thing to attack the person and not the argument. Once you do that it is just mud slinging. The discussion according to the article was about the bilingual school not Brighton and Hove. Once you have started a personal attack you have lost the argument. especially since you are making assumptions about other peoples experiences. So comments about "climb off your soapbox", "do some research" and " diverting taxpayers money to other causes" show more about the type of person you are than my experience in schools. Your mudslinging does the school no favours and simply confirms the reports, the type of people running the school and why it is failing,
@ ivegotanopiniontoo. Maybe it's a provincial thing to attack the person and not the argument. Once you do that it is just mud slinging. The discussion according to the article was about the bilingual school not Brighton and Hove. Once you have started a personal attack you have lost the argument. especially since you are making assumptions about other peoples experiences. So comments about "climb off your soapbox", "do some research" and " diverting taxpayers money to other causes" show more about the type of person you are than my experience in schools. Your mudslinging does the school no favours and simply confirms the reports, the type of people running the school and why it is failing, Schoolwatch2014
  • Score: -8

7:29am Sat 26 Jul 14

Ortelius says...

Schoolwatch2014 wrote:
@ ivegotanopiniontoo. Maybe it's a provincial thing to attack the person and not the argument. Once you do that it is just mud slinging. The discussion according to the article was about the bilingual school not Brighton and Hove. Once you have started a personal attack you have lost the argument. especially since you are making assumptions about other peoples experiences. So comments about "climb off your soapbox", "do some research" and " diverting taxpayers money to other causes" show more about the type of person you are than my experience in schools. Your mudslinging does the school no favours and simply confirms the reports, the type of people running the school and why it is failing,
@schoolwatch2014 please don't sling mud yourself. Nobody at Ofsted said the education at my son's school was "poor" or that it was "failing" there are good plans in place to improve and that is good. Parents as well will hold the school to accout. Surely it is in the best interests of all of us for this school to do well and for everyone in Brighton and Hove to have the amazing opportunity that this school provides for their children.
[quote][p][bold]Schoolwatch2014[/bold] wrote: @ ivegotanopiniontoo. Maybe it's a provincial thing to attack the person and not the argument. Once you do that it is just mud slinging. The discussion according to the article was about the bilingual school not Brighton and Hove. Once you have started a personal attack you have lost the argument. especially since you are making assumptions about other peoples experiences. So comments about "climb off your soapbox", "do some research" and " diverting taxpayers money to other causes" show more about the type of person you are than my experience in schools. Your mudslinging does the school no favours and simply confirms the reports, the type of people running the school and why it is failing,[/p][/quote]@schoolwatch2014 please don't sling mud yourself. Nobody at Ofsted said the education at my son's school was "poor" or that it was "failing" there are good plans in place to improve and that is good. Parents as well will hold the school to accout. Surely it is in the best interests of all of us for this school to do well and for everyone in Brighton and Hove to have the amazing opportunity that this school provides for their children. Ortelius
  • Score: 5

8:51am Sat 26 Jul 14

I'vegotanopiniontoo says...

Schoolwatch2014 wrote:
@ ivegotanopiniontoo. Maybe it's a provincial thing to attack the person and not the argument. Once you do that it is just mud slinging. The discussion according to the article was about the bilingual school not Brighton and Hove. Once you have started a personal attack you have lost the argument. especially since you are making assumptions about other peoples experiences. So comments about "climb off your soapbox", "do some research" and " diverting taxpayers money to other causes" show more about the type of person you are than my experience in schools. Your mudslinging does the school no favours and simply confirms the reports, the type of people running the school and why it is failing,
@schoolwatch2014

The main point is that it's not an argument, it's a discussion. In life you are allowed to have opinions, both about content, their merit or the person. Your reply is totally contradictive, which maybe shows your true values, I'll explain to you, You state, "Once you have started a personal attack you have lost the argument. " Then you state "show more about the type of person you are".

An attack on someone would be more along the lines of, "you're pretty ignorant to make that comment". Which of course was never said.

I didn't mention the school in my reply to you, I commented on your reply, again, this goes back to research, before you make a comment.

Personally I'd hate to make an assumption like, your experience in schools with a name such as Schoolwatch2014, is probably minimal and self appointed, without any real value.

So what I'd love to know is your experience in schools to validate your claim. Of course, remember that you are personally responsible for what you post on this site.

Can't wait to hear from you
[quote][p][bold]Schoolwatch2014[/bold] wrote: @ ivegotanopiniontoo. Maybe it's a provincial thing to attack the person and not the argument. Once you do that it is just mud slinging. The discussion according to the article was about the bilingual school not Brighton and Hove. Once you have started a personal attack you have lost the argument. especially since you are making assumptions about other peoples experiences. So comments about "climb off your soapbox", "do some research" and " diverting taxpayers money to other causes" show more about the type of person you are than my experience in schools. Your mudslinging does the school no favours and simply confirms the reports, the type of people running the school and why it is failing,[/p][/quote]@schoolwatch2014 The main point is that it's not an argument, it's a discussion. In life you are allowed to have opinions, both about content, their merit or the person. Your reply is totally contradictive, which maybe shows your true values, I'll explain to you, You state, "Once you have started a personal attack you have lost the argument. " Then you state "show more about the type of person you are". An attack on someone would be more along the lines of, "you're pretty ignorant to make that comment". Which of course was never said. I didn't mention the school in my reply to you, I commented on your reply, again, this goes back to research, before you make a comment. Personally I'd hate to make an assumption like, your experience in schools with a name such as Schoolwatch2014, is probably minimal and self appointed, without any real value. So what I'd love to know is your experience in schools to validate your claim. Of course, remember that you are personally responsible for what you post on this site. Can't wait to hear from you I'vegotanopiniontoo
  • Score: 6

9:20am Sat 26 Jul 14

Schoolwatch2014 says...

Still another personal attack, A reasoned discussion doesn't involve personal opinions on a person's character, experience or abilities, especially when all you are doing is restating the same prejudices you have against someone who doesn't agree with you. And when discussion is purely opinion disguised as fact it is no longer a discussion, it is a partisan rant. Either way, my experience and your opinions are irrelevant - the school has been found wanting in both educational and financial terms by independent external bodies. Deflecting tactics still don't detract from a poor performing school that isn't providing value for the tax payers money.
Still another personal attack, A reasoned discussion doesn't involve personal opinions on a person's character, experience or abilities, especially when all you are doing is restating the same prejudices you have against someone who doesn't agree with you. And when discussion is purely opinion disguised as fact it is no longer a discussion, it is a partisan rant. Either way, my experience and your opinions are irrelevant - the school has been found wanting in both educational and financial terms by independent external bodies. Deflecting tactics still don't detract from a poor performing school that isn't providing value for the tax payers money. Schoolwatch2014
  • Score: -7

9:35am Sat 26 Jul 14

I'vegotanopiniontoo says...

Schoolwatch2014 wrote:
Still another personal attack, A reasoned discussion doesn't involve personal opinions on a person's character, experience or abilities, especially when all you are doing is restating the same prejudices you have against someone who doesn't agree with you. And when discussion is purely opinion disguised as fact it is no longer a discussion, it is a partisan rant. Either way, my experience and your opinions are irrelevant - the school has been found wanting in both educational and financial terms by independent external bodies. Deflecting tactics still don't detract from a poor performing school that isn't providing value for the tax payers money.
With a name such as your's, your experience as you quote is very relevant

I haven't disagreed with you that is wasn't a bad report, however "inspectors praising standards that were ABOVE THOSE typical for pupils’ ages while school leaders had made recent improvements in teaching and pupils’ progress."

Is that still a waste of taxpayers money as you state?
[quote][p][bold]Schoolwatch2014[/bold] wrote: Still another personal attack, A reasoned discussion doesn't involve personal opinions on a person's character, experience or abilities, especially when all you are doing is restating the same prejudices you have against someone who doesn't agree with you. And when discussion is purely opinion disguised as fact it is no longer a discussion, it is a partisan rant. Either way, my experience and your opinions are irrelevant - the school has been found wanting in both educational and financial terms by independent external bodies. Deflecting tactics still don't detract from a poor performing school that isn't providing value for the tax payers money.[/p][/quote]With a name such as your's, your experience as you quote is very relevant I haven't disagreed with you that is wasn't a bad report, however "inspectors praising standards that were ABOVE THOSE typical for pupils’ ages while school leaders had made recent improvements in teaching and pupils’ progress." Is that still a waste of taxpayers money as you state? I'vegotanopiniontoo
  • Score: 4

10:50am Sat 26 Jul 14

Schoolwatch2014 says...

Misquoting as a tool of argument is again a way of deflecting the point that is being made. I didn't state it was a "waste of money" rather "poor value for money" which is a different matter entirely. Public funds quite logically require public accountability especially when pupils education is at stake. Quoting the bits of reports one finds to substantiate one's own opinions on a matter can also be misleading. The report actually said children enter the school with higher than average abilities stating as a result of this they much greater progress is expected in what they are able to achieve.
Misquoting as a tool of argument is again a way of deflecting the point that is being made. I didn't state it was a "waste of money" rather "poor value for money" which is a different matter entirely. Public funds quite logically require public accountability especially when pupils education is at stake. Quoting the bits of reports one finds to substantiate one's own opinions on a matter can also be misleading. The report actually said children enter the school with higher than average abilities stating as a result of this they much greater progress is expected in what they are able to achieve. Schoolwatch2014
  • Score: -4

1:37pm Sat 26 Jul 14

Kristina2 says...

saveHOVE wrote:
Kristina2 wrote:
Schoolwatch2014 wrote:
As lessons are taught entirely in English with separate dedicated Spanish lessons it is a very good example of learning Spanish as a second language not as a bilingual one. Bilingualism requires equal usage on both languages not just being able to read, translate or understand, which are functions of learning a language as a second language.
Yes, the ideal solution is to have a bilingual teacher or two teachers one teaching in English and the other in Spanish. However, as this is not a private school so it doesn't have enough money to emloy two teachers. It's a small school and it gets less money than other schools as you get money per child. All over Europe schools claim to be bilingual but not necessary having equal usage on both languages especially when most of children don't speak the language. Being a teacher of foreign languages I disagree it is taught as a second language as the aquisition is far better in the case of BPS. I taught children age 7 and above a foreign language abroad for years and can see massive difference. Even if it is not fully bilingual there is not really measures of how quickly you should aquire. Even we as humans need at least two years to be able to talk. Children at school hear Spanish each day during breaks and lunchtime and during lessons. Instead of critisising why don't we give it a chance to develop and improve especially if we have got so many happy parents and kids and children who achieve.
You detour into language teaching as you see it and divert attention from all the other OFSTED criticisms too.

But carry on. Ignore the OFSTED and EFA criticisms and requiremens. Go your own sweet way and see where you end up.

I understand the Dept. of Education is reviewing how they run Academies/Free Schools with a view to tightening up and putting stronger controls in place - such as sacking entire boards of governors if need be and installing replacements.

I think people misinterpret the word "Free". It does not mean doing what you please. It means free from local authority control.
I think the exchange of views has no sense here. As to my astonishment you keep misreading most of the posts. As stated a few times by me and other supporters improvements are needed and welcome. However,I can't deny my child's amazing progress at school. Would you like me to say she hasn't got top marks in her SATs or that she can't use Spanish or correct grammar structures without realising she does which are traces of immersion rather than learning a foreign language. I am just stating facts that are her and the school's great achievements. As for my typo mistakes I am a foreigner who speaks a few languages. To prevent your further attacks I am not Spanish, work full time and pay taxes. To avoid even more attacts most children come from monolingual British families. I have posted here only because I know how much benefit being multilingual means. Working in education I know there are many more schools in Brighton and Hove which got requires improvement . To be honest I think it must be either your personal issue with freeschools or languages that sets you against the school which has an amazing offer what would be more than welcome all over the world. Even if it requires improvement as other schools do it has got more to offer than other schools which have received good OFSTED report. Thank you for reading.
[quote][p][bold]saveHOVE[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Kristina2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Schoolwatch2014[/bold] wrote: As lessons are taught entirely in English with separate dedicated Spanish lessons it is a very good example of learning Spanish as a second language not as a bilingual one. Bilingualism requires equal usage on both languages not just being able to read, translate or understand, which are functions of learning a language as a second language.[/p][/quote]Yes, the ideal solution is to have a bilingual teacher or two teachers one teaching in English and the other in Spanish. However, as this is not a private school so it doesn't have enough money to emloy two teachers. It's a small school and it gets less money than other schools as you get money per child. All over Europe schools claim to be bilingual but not necessary having equal usage on both languages especially when most of children don't speak the language. Being a teacher of foreign languages I disagree it is taught as a second language as the aquisition is far better in the case of BPS. I taught children age 7 and above a foreign language abroad for years and can see massive difference. Even if it is not fully bilingual there is not really measures of how quickly you should aquire. Even we as humans need at least two years to be able to talk. Children at school hear Spanish each day during breaks and lunchtime and during lessons. Instead of critisising why don't we give it a chance to develop and improve especially if we have got so many happy parents and kids and children who achieve.[/p][/quote]You detour into language teaching as you see it and divert attention from all the other OFSTED criticisms too. But carry on. Ignore the OFSTED and EFA criticisms and requiremens. Go your own sweet way and see where you end up. I understand the Dept. of Education is reviewing how they run Academies/Free Schools with a view to tightening up and putting stronger controls in place - such as sacking entire boards of governors if need be and installing replacements. I think people misinterpret the word "Free". It does not mean doing what you please. It means free from local authority control.[/p][/quote]I think the exchange of views has no sense here. As to my astonishment you keep misreading most of the posts. As stated a few times by me and other supporters improvements are needed and welcome. However,I can't deny my child's amazing progress at school. Would you like me to say she hasn't got top marks in her SATs or that she can't use Spanish or correct grammar structures without realising she does which are traces of immersion rather than learning a foreign language. I am just stating facts that are her and the school's great achievements. As for my typo mistakes I am a foreigner who speaks a few languages. To prevent your further attacks I am not Spanish, work full time and pay taxes. To avoid even more attacts most children come from monolingual British families. I have posted here only because I know how much benefit being multilingual means. Working in education I know there are many more schools in Brighton and Hove which got requires improvement . To be honest I think it must be either your personal issue with freeschools or languages that sets you against the school which has an amazing offer what would be more than welcome all over the world. Even if it requires improvement as other schools do it has got more to offer than other schools which have received good OFSTED report. Thank you for reading. Kristina2
  • Score: 4

5:39pm Sat 26 Jul 14

Kristina2 says...

Kristina2 wrote:
saveHOVE wrote:
Kristina2 wrote:
Schoolwatch2014 wrote:
As lessons are taught entirely in English with separate dedicated Spanish lessons it is a very good example of learning Spanish as a second language not as a bilingual one. Bilingualism requires equal usage on both languages not just being able to read, translate or understand, which are functions of learning a language as a second language.
Yes, the ideal solution is to have a bilingual teacher or two teachers one teaching in English and the other in Spanish. However, as this is not a private school so it doesn't have enough money to emloy two teachers. It's a small school and it gets less money than other schools as you get money per child. All over Europe schools claim to be bilingual but not necessary having equal usage on both languages especially when most of children don't speak the language. Being a teacher of foreign languages I disagree it is taught as a second language as the aquisition is far better in the case of BPS. I taught children age 7 and above a foreign language abroad for years and can see massive difference. Even if it is not fully bilingual there is not really measures of how quickly you should aquire. Even we as humans need at least two years to be able to talk. Children at school hear Spanish each day during breaks and lunchtime and during lessons. Instead of critisising why don't we give it a chance to develop and improve especially if we have got so many happy parents and kids and children who achieve.
You detour into language teaching as you see it and divert attention from all the other OFSTED criticisms too.

But carry on. Ignore the OFSTED and EFA criticisms and requiremens. Go your own sweet way and see where you end up.

I understand the Dept. of Education is reviewing how they run Academies/Free Schools with a view to tightening up and putting stronger controls in place - such as sacking entire boards of governors if need be and installing replacements.

I think people misinterpret the word "Free". It does not mean doing what you please. It means free from local authority control.
I think the exchange of views has no sense here. As to my astonishment you keep misreading most of the posts. As stated a few times by me and other supporters improvements are needed and welcome. However,I can't deny my child's amazing progress at school. Would you like me to say she hasn't got top marks in her SATs or that she can't use Spanish or correct grammar structures without realising she does which are traces of immersion rather than learning a foreign language. I am just stating facts that are her and the school's great achievements. As for my typo mistakes I am a foreigner who speaks a few languages. To prevent your further attacks I am not Spanish, work full time and pay taxes. To avoid even more attacts most children come from monolingual British families. I have posted here only because I know how much benefit being multilingual means. Working in education I know there are many more schools in Brighton and Hove which got requires improvement . To be honest I think it must be either your personal issue with freeschools or languages that sets you against the school which has an amazing offer what would be more than welcome all over the world. Even if it requires improvement as other schools do it has got more to offer than other schools which have received good OFSTED report. Thank you for reading.
I can't agree more with Ortelius that it is wierd and sick to read posts that seem as if people wanted the school to fail. I have never met with such an attitude before. And when I see Save Hove I can't believe, Valerie, somebody can be so against education for children. If it wasn't a personal fight you would focus on other schools as well. If it was objective you would listen to possitive comments too and ponder why they are possitive but you just don't want to. It's sad that such a powerful name as SaveHove will stay in the memory of many people associated with criticise and hinder rather than help and create.
[quote][p][bold]Kristina2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]saveHOVE[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Kristina2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Schoolwatch2014[/bold] wrote: As lessons are taught entirely in English with separate dedicated Spanish lessons it is a very good example of learning Spanish as a second language not as a bilingual one. Bilingualism requires equal usage on both languages not just being able to read, translate or understand, which are functions of learning a language as a second language.[/p][/quote]Yes, the ideal solution is to have a bilingual teacher or two teachers one teaching in English and the other in Spanish. However, as this is not a private school so it doesn't have enough money to emloy two teachers. It's a small school and it gets less money than other schools as you get money per child. All over Europe schools claim to be bilingual but not necessary having equal usage on both languages especially when most of children don't speak the language. Being a teacher of foreign languages I disagree it is taught as a second language as the aquisition is far better in the case of BPS. I taught children age 7 and above a foreign language abroad for years and can see massive difference. Even if it is not fully bilingual there is not really measures of how quickly you should aquire. Even we as humans need at least two years to be able to talk. Children at school hear Spanish each day during breaks and lunchtime and during lessons. Instead of critisising why don't we give it a chance to develop and improve especially if we have got so many happy parents and kids and children who achieve.[/p][/quote]You detour into language teaching as you see it and divert attention from all the other OFSTED criticisms too. But carry on. Ignore the OFSTED and EFA criticisms and requiremens. Go your own sweet way and see where you end up. I understand the Dept. of Education is reviewing how they run Academies/Free Schools with a view to tightening up and putting stronger controls in place - such as sacking entire boards of governors if need be and installing replacements. I think people misinterpret the word "Free". It does not mean doing what you please. It means free from local authority control.[/p][/quote]I think the exchange of views has no sense here. As to my astonishment you keep misreading most of the posts. As stated a few times by me and other supporters improvements are needed and welcome. However,I can't deny my child's amazing progress at school. Would you like me to say she hasn't got top marks in her SATs or that she can't use Spanish or correct grammar structures without realising she does which are traces of immersion rather than learning a foreign language. I am just stating facts that are her and the school's great achievements. As for my typo mistakes I am a foreigner who speaks a few languages. To prevent your further attacks I am not Spanish, work full time and pay taxes. To avoid even more attacts most children come from monolingual British families. I have posted here only because I know how much benefit being multilingual means. Working in education I know there are many more schools in Brighton and Hove which got requires improvement . To be honest I think it must be either your personal issue with freeschools or languages that sets you against the school which has an amazing offer what would be more than welcome all over the world. Even if it requires improvement as other schools do it has got more to offer than other schools which have received good OFSTED report. Thank you for reading.[/p][/quote]I can't agree more with Ortelius that it is wierd and sick to read posts that seem as if people wanted the school to fail. I have never met with such an attitude before. And when I see Save Hove I can't believe, Valerie, somebody can be so against education for children. If it wasn't a personal fight you would focus on other schools as well. If it was objective you would listen to possitive comments too and ponder why they are possitive but you just don't want to. It's sad that such a powerful name as SaveHove will stay in the memory of many people associated with criticise and hinder rather than help and create. Kristina2
  • Score: 3

5:43pm Sat 26 Jul 14

Tel Scoomer says...

Sadly the level of ignorance and bile displayed by 'Schoolwatch2014' and the grammatically nonsensical 'SaveHOVE' are typical of what you can expect to find on this website. The greater the number of parents who comment, the clearer it becomes that the Ofsted inspectors have made some kind of mistake.
I was pleased to learn the school isn't challenging its Ofsted report even though it obviously disagrees with key parts of it. And I was pleased to learn the school is keen to improve. From what I have read elsewhere, the school highlighted some of the areas for improvement in a self-evaluation handed to Ofsted.
When every parent who comments says their child is speaking Spanish in sentences and not giving just one-word answers, it undermines the credibility of the inspectors themselves. Perhaps they failed to ask the type of questions that elicit more than a one-word answer. Who inspects the inspectors?
I took a look at the EFA report mentioned by the ludicrous SaveHOVE (why the out-of-place capital letters?) and the Argus coverage of it. It is a long way from damning. A so-called whistleblower alleged fraud. The report found no fraud. A new school - and a very small school at that - didn't have in place all the systems that should be in place but is remedying the relatively minor deficiencies with EFA oversight. Gosh!
If this is the best the critics can come up with, then it's time they left the school, parents and pupils to get on with it. The bilingual school looks more like a model school which should be emulated than one that justifies the rather ranty ramblings of one or two ill-informed and bitter-sounding commenters.
Sadly the level of ignorance and bile displayed by 'Schoolwatch2014' and the grammatically nonsensical 'SaveHOVE' are typical of what you can expect to find on this website. The greater the number of parents who comment, the clearer it becomes that the Ofsted inspectors have made some kind of mistake. I was pleased to learn the school isn't challenging its Ofsted report even though it obviously disagrees with key parts of it. And I was pleased to learn the school is keen to improve. From what I have read elsewhere, the school highlighted some of the areas for improvement in a self-evaluation handed to Ofsted. When every parent who comments says their child is speaking Spanish in sentences and not giving just one-word answers, it undermines the credibility of the inspectors themselves. Perhaps they failed to ask the type of questions that elicit more than a one-word answer. Who inspects the inspectors? I took a look at the EFA report mentioned by the ludicrous SaveHOVE (why the out-of-place capital letters?) and the Argus coverage of it. It is a long way from damning. A so-called whistleblower alleged fraud. The report found no fraud. A new school - and a very small school at that - didn't have in place all the systems that should be in place but is remedying the relatively minor deficiencies with EFA oversight. Gosh! If this is the best the critics can come up with, then it's time they left the school, parents and pupils to get on with it. The bilingual school looks more like a model school which should be emulated than one that justifies the rather ranty ramblings of one or two ill-informed and bitter-sounding commenters. Tel Scoomer
  • Score: 4

6:42pm Sat 26 Jul 14

Kristina2 says...

Schoolwatch2014 wrote:
Misquoting as a tool of argument is again a way of deflecting the point that is being made. I didn't state it was a "waste of money" rather "poor value for money" which is a different matter entirely. Public funds quite logically require public accountability especially when pupils education is at stake. Quoting the bits of reports one finds to substantiate one's own opinions on a matter can also be misleading. The report actually said children enter the school with higher than average abilities stating as a result of this they much greater progress is expected in what they are able to achieve.
Schoolwatch2014 your name is misleading. There isn't anywhere in the report that children enter the school with higher than average abilities. This is a misquote? That's you praising our children and thinking they are very intelligent which I have no doubt they are. The report just says children should achieve more regarding their starting point and I don't question it. However, 9 sublevels in reading, 7 in writing and 6 in maths are stunning achievements for a child during 2 years of their learning. It's nearly a miricle. I think you know what I mean. Some other children from the school achieved amazingly as well. I have no doubt Ofsted is right but I have got the right to think they might have forgotten to mention some children achieved amazingly regarding their starting point.
[quote][p][bold]Schoolwatch2014[/bold] wrote: Misquoting as a tool of argument is again a way of deflecting the point that is being made. I didn't state it was a "waste of money" rather "poor value for money" which is a different matter entirely. Public funds quite logically require public accountability especially when pupils education is at stake. Quoting the bits of reports one finds to substantiate one's own opinions on a matter can also be misleading. The report actually said children enter the school with higher than average abilities stating as a result of this they much greater progress is expected in what they are able to achieve.[/p][/quote]Schoolwatch2014 your name is misleading. There isn't anywhere in the report that children enter the school with higher than average abilities. This is a misquote? That's you praising our children and thinking they are very intelligent which I have no doubt they are. The report just says children should achieve more regarding their starting point and I don't question it. However, 9 sublevels in reading, 7 in writing and 6 in maths are stunning achievements for a child during 2 years of their learning. It's nearly a miricle. I think you know what I mean. Some other children from the school achieved amazingly as well. I have no doubt Ofsted is right but I have got the right to think they might have forgotten to mention some children achieved amazingly regarding their starting point. Kristina2
  • Score: 1

11:02pm Sat 26 Jul 14

Fred Long says...

Nine sub levels is outstanding. Is Ofsted critical of pupil progress because not all students progressed by nine sub levels? It seems like it. Other schools are judged against a benchmark of six sub levels.
The more I look at this Ofsted report, the more it seems mistaken and misleading.
On a minor point, I see SaveHOVE is a regular ranter against this particular school. Valerie Paynter, for it is she, opposed the school's planning application because, among many other things, the children might play in the park. We can't have children playing parks!
But Schoolwatch 2014 appears to be a completely fabricated name. There is no Google trace even with quite a deep and detailed set of searches. Whoever it is seems to have an axe to grind and is going about it in an unhealthy and destructive way.
This school is undoubtedly not perfect. It's tiny and it's not even two years old. But it appears to have suffered a grave injustice at the hands of two Ofsted inspectors whose own credentials must now surely be called into question.
Nine sub levels is outstanding. Is Ofsted critical of pupil progress because not all students progressed by nine sub levels? It seems like it. Other schools are judged against a benchmark of six sub levels. The more I look at this Ofsted report, the more it seems mistaken and misleading. On a minor point, I see SaveHOVE is a regular ranter against this particular school. Valerie Paynter, for it is she, opposed the school's planning application because, among many other things, the children might play in the park. We can't have children playing parks! But Schoolwatch 2014 appears to be a completely fabricated name. There is no Google trace even with quite a deep and detailed set of searches. Whoever it is seems to have an axe to grind and is going about it in an unhealthy and destructive way. This school is undoubtedly not perfect. It's tiny and it's not even two years old. But it appears to have suffered a grave injustice at the hands of two Ofsted inspectors whose own credentials must now surely be called into question. Fred Long
  • Score: 3

7:45am Sun 27 Jul 14

Kristina2 says...

Fred Long wrote:
Nine sub levels is outstanding. Is Ofsted critical of pupil progress because not all students progressed by nine sub levels? It seems like it. Other schools are judged against a benchmark of six sub levels.
The more I look at this Ofsted report, the more it seems mistaken and misleading.
On a minor point, I see SaveHOVE is a regular ranter against this particular school. Valerie Paynter, for it is she, opposed the school's planning application because, among many other things, the children might play in the park. We can't have children playing parks!
But Schoolwatch 2014 appears to be a completely fabricated name. There is no Google trace even with quite a deep and detailed set of searches. Whoever it is seems to have an axe to grind and is going about it in an unhealthy and destructive way.
This school is undoubtedly not perfect. It's tiny and it's not even two years old. But it appears to have suffered a grave injustice at the hands of two Ofsted inspectors whose own credentials must now surely be called into question.
2 sub levels per year is expected national curriculum target.
[quote][p][bold]Fred Long[/bold] wrote: Nine sub levels is outstanding. Is Ofsted critical of pupil progress because not all students progressed by nine sub levels? It seems like it. Other schools are judged against a benchmark of six sub levels. The more I look at this Ofsted report, the more it seems mistaken and misleading. On a minor point, I see SaveHOVE is a regular ranter against this particular school. Valerie Paynter, for it is she, opposed the school's planning application because, among many other things, the children might play in the park. We can't have children playing parks! But Schoolwatch 2014 appears to be a completely fabricated name. There is no Google trace even with quite a deep and detailed set of searches. Whoever it is seems to have an axe to grind and is going about it in an unhealthy and destructive way. This school is undoubtedly not perfect. It's tiny and it's not even two years old. But it appears to have suffered a grave injustice at the hands of two Ofsted inspectors whose own credentials must now surely be called into question.[/p][/quote]2 sub levels per year is expected national curriculum target. Kristina2
  • Score: 1

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