Agency launches inquiry as 100 fish die in stream

Agency launches inquiry as 100 fish die in stream

Testing by the agency

An agency workman with an oxyget that oxygenates the water

Agency launches inquiry as 100 fish die in stream

First published in News
Last updated
by , Health reporter

AN investigation has been launched to trace the source of pollution in a stream which killed almost 100 fish.

Tests were carried out at Bevern Stream in Barcombe, near Lewes, following the discovery of dead and distressed fish in the water.

Experts from the Environment Agency were sent out after the alarm was raised and discovered low oxygen levels in the stream.

Teams used specialist equipment to improve oxygen and clear the area.

The types of fish affected are said to be carp and chub.

This incident comes after 900 fish died in the River Adur East near Burgess Hill last month.

The agency continued to monitor the stream, a tributary of the River Ouse, for a few days after the incident, which happened on Monday.

It says the situation has now improved but they have not yet discovered the cause.

A spokesman said: “We have no officers on site as oxygen levels have returned to normal, which indicates a good level of water quality.

“Live fish have been seen and none are in distress.

“We are awaiting the results of water sample tests.”

A spokesman for Southern Water said it had been contacted by the Environment Agency on Monday when the fish were found.

He said: “We have a treatment works and a sewer near the stream but we have found no faults which would have affected the water quality.”

Herpes outbreak strikes koi carp

A FISHERY has been closed following an outbreak of herpes among its koi carp.

Woodpeckers Fishing Lakes at Ley House Farm, Worth, near Crawley, is now subject to controls from the Fish Health Inspectorate, acting for the government.

All movement of fish to, from and within the fishery complex has been banned.

Fishery equipment disinfection measures are also now in place and anglers must ensure that they comply within the designated area.

The fishery owners reported the problem and voluntarily closed the fishery as soon as KHV disease was suspected.

KHV cannot be passed on to humans but is a serious viral disease of fish. It affects all varieties of common and ornamental carp and is often deadly.

Signs of KHV disease may include white or necrotic patches on the gills, rough patches on the skin, sloughing mucous and sunken eyes.

Comments (3)

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10:59am Sat 2 Aug 14

wippasnapper says...

probable Southern Water again
probable Southern Water again wippasnapper
  • Score: 7

5:19pm Sat 2 Aug 14

getThisCoalitionOut says...

Southern Water always cover up their mistakes and deny everything.

They are a complete menace. Only interested in making money and giving profit to their vile shareholders.

All water companies should be renationalised - there weren't these problems before they were.
Southern Water always cover up their mistakes and deny everything. They are a complete menace. Only interested in making money and giving profit to their vile shareholders. All water companies should be renationalised - there weren't these problems before they were. getThisCoalitionOut
  • Score: 0

3:09pm Mon 4 Aug 14

ModelCitizen says...

I live directly above the area that was polluted and have fished it regularly for over eight years. Up until last week I was nipping down there with a rod (called 'taking the dog for a walk') every three days or so. The stretch had some of the best (If not 'the' best) small stream fishing in Sussex. the variety was amazing:In a small stretch i could catch chub, roach, minnow, gudgeon, stone loach, perch, carp, sea trout, eels, goldfish (really) and once even a pike. Since the spill all I've been able to catch are minnows. There doesn't appear to be any fish of any size left.

In the time i've fished it the Southern Water's Barcombe Sewage Treatment has overflowed into the stream at least three times. One time I was fishing it as it happened. The stream turned into a sewer. It looked and stunk exactly like one.

Southern Water always deny responsibility but there is no shadow of a doubt in my mind that there is a problem at their Barcombe Sewage Treatment Works. The Environment Agency should throw the book at them. In fact I'm going to ring them now.

The real big shame this time is that signal crayfish have recently been found in the stream. They voracious nature of these introduced predators makes it very unlikely the stream will ever recover.
I live directly above the area that was polluted and have fished it regularly for over eight years. Up until last week I was nipping down there with a rod (called 'taking the dog for a walk') every three days or so. The stretch had some of the best (If not 'the' best) small stream fishing in Sussex. the variety was amazing:In a small stretch i could catch chub, roach, minnow, gudgeon, stone loach, perch, carp, sea trout, eels, goldfish (really) and once even a pike. Since the spill all I've been able to catch are minnows. There doesn't appear to be any fish of any size left. In the time i've fished it the Southern Water's Barcombe Sewage Treatment has overflowed into the stream at least three times. One time I was fishing it as it happened. The stream turned into a sewer. It looked and stunk exactly like one. Southern Water always deny responsibility but there is no shadow of a doubt in my mind that there is a problem at their Barcombe Sewage Treatment Works. The Environment Agency should throw the book at them. In fact I'm going to ring them now. The real big shame this time is that signal crayfish have recently been found in the stream. They voracious nature of these introduced predators makes it very unlikely the stream will ever recover. ModelCitizen
  • Score: 0

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