Dealers travelled 300 miles to sell heroin in seaside flat

Dealers travelled 300 miles to sell heroin in seaside flat

Dealers travelled 300 miles to sell heroin in seaside flat

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DRUG dealers travelled nearly 300 miles to “exploit” a middle-aged heroin addict to peddle drugs from her flat in Hove.

Long-term user Avril Glasgow was spared jail yesterday after being targeted by the “professional” operation.

The dealers from Liverpool supplied her with heroin in return for using her Ingram Crescent home to supply Class A drugs last year.

She was sentenced alongside nine others who all pleaded guilty to offences ranging from conspiracy to supply to money laundering, after the operation was busted by police.

Handing her a suspended sentence at Hove Crown Court, Judge Richard Hayward said: “You have had a drug habit for many, many years, which has blighted your life.

“They supplied you at your home and then started to use your home to supply others.“You had an abusive childhood and started abusing drugs from a young age.

“I accept that you are vulnerable and you were exploited by others.”

Kevin Freeman, 35, used the telephone in Rochester prison and at least nine mobile phones to run the show”, communicating mainly through his partner, Lisa McGee, and brother, Karl Freeman, until the latter was beaten up and seriously injured.

Heroin and cocaine were sourced in Liverpool and taken to Hove by Steven Reed, 30, and John Kerwin, 30, who sold them on, working from Glasgow’s house as well as the Smart Sea View hostel in St Catharine’s Terrace, Hove.

They are known to have made 41 trips between Liverpool and Brighton, although Judge Hayward accepted there would have been many more visits.

Profits were taken back to Liverpool and some put into bank accounts belonging to the dealers’ girlfriends. Prosecutors estimate the operation involved up to £500,000 worth of drugs.

Police watched the group for months before arresting Reed and
Kerwin at Glasgow’s home on June 5 last year.

Officers got permission to keep them in custody to wait for them to pass drugs believed to be stashed inside their bodies. Days later the pair confessed to having drugs – a total of 37 grams of nearly 80 per cent pure cocaine, worth an estimated £4,440.

Detective Sergeant Julian Deans, of Sussex Police Organised Crime Investigation Team, who led the investigation, said the convictions would have a “significant impact” on the local trade.

He said officers bided their time watching the ring before making arrests in order to build up evidence of a conspiracy and secure longer
sentences.

Detective Constable Mark Pinder said Hove was probably chosen because it was known to the Freeman brothers, who had previous convictions for supply in the area.

New power helped police inquiry

DS JULIAN Deans said a power in the Criminal Justice Act was a big help in the investigation.

Reed and Kerwin still had drugs stashed inside their bodies when they were first arrested and charged with drugs offences.

Police applied to magistrates to keep the pair in custody until the drugs had passed.

The pair admitted having the drugs after being told they would face another 14 days in custody.

DS Deans said: “Wherever you hide drugs and whatever you do, we will find you.

“They did everything to hide the drugs including refusing food and drink while in custody but when they were charged they realised it was time to give up.”

Sentences given out

The following pleaded guilty to conspiracy to supplying class A drugs, heroin and cocaine.

Kevin Freeman, 35, of Sparrowhawk Close, Liverpool: Jailed for nine years Karl Freeman, 36, of Ellencliff, Liverpool: Jailed for eight years Lisa McGee, 33, of Cowley Road, Liverpool: Jailed for four years, 11 months Steven Reed, 30, of Woburn Close, Liverpool: Jailed for six years, 11 months John Kerwin, 30, of Clarendon Road, Liverpool: Jailed for six years, 11 months Andrew Clarke, 33, of Bleasdale Road, Liverpool: Jailed for five years, four months The following pleaded guilty to converting criminal goods: Patricia Wood, 49, of Childers Street, Liverpoool (£1,870 paid into bank account): 12-month supervision requirement and must attend women's turnaround project for 20 days.

Sophie Pearson, 32, of Clarendon Road, Liverpool (£15,295 paid into bank account): jailed for nine months suspended for 18 months, 12-month supervision and must attend women’s turnaround project for 20 days.

Jade Owen, 25, of Woburn Close, Liverpool (£12,125 paid into bank account): pleaded guilty to converting criminal goods, jailed for eight months suspended for 18 months, supervision of 12 months and must attend women’s turnaround project for 20 days.

Avril Glasgow, 57, of Ingram Crescent, Hove, pleaded guilty to allowing her premises to be used for the sale of class A drugs: jailed for ten months, suspended for 18 months.

Comments (25)

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6:35am Tue 5 Aug 14

MikeyA says...

" Officers got permission to keep them in custody to wait for them to pass drugs believed to be stashed inside their bodies.

He said officers bided their time watching the ring ....."

That must have been interesting.....
" Officers got permission to keep them in custody to wait for them to pass drugs believed to be stashed inside their bodies. He said officers bided their time watching the ring ....." That must have been interesting..... MikeyA
  • Score: 20

7:53am Tue 5 Aug 14

stevensavage says...

congratulations to the police for getting these dealers of death locked up. however nobody should be given suspended sentences by the courts.every day we walk through our towns and city see the results of heroin users on every street corner.theres always someone ready and willing to take over from those in custody.to lock every one involved up no matter what role they play,sends a better message to people
congratulations to the police for getting these dealers of death locked up. however nobody should be given suspended sentences by the courts.every day we walk through our towns and city see the results of heroin users on every street corner.theres always someone ready and willing to take over from those in custody.to lock every one involved up no matter what role they play,sends a better message to people stevensavage
  • Score: 47

8:11am Tue 5 Aug 14

firemanste says...

almost everyone of us know a heroin addict and from experience they go from being your own brother into a thief who you dont know and cant trust anymore.when they try and get help these low life dealers give free samples to make sure your brother stays in the same vicious circle where the next step is a wooden box.jail every single one connected with this crime.10 years they should of each gotten.my brothers had a life sentence of being an addict
almost everyone of us know a heroin addict and from experience they go from being your own brother into a thief who you dont know and cant trust anymore.when they try and get help these low life dealers give free samples to make sure your brother stays in the same vicious circle where the next step is a wooden box.jail every single one connected with this crime.10 years they should of each gotten.my brothers had a life sentence of being an addict firemanste
  • Score: 32

8:13am Tue 5 Aug 14

John Steed says...

this modus operandi is not new and causes untold harm to the person whose property is taken over. In Worthing numerous cases have occurred over the last 5-7 years and in all cases the tenant was the looser often loosing there children into the care system as well as their flat. the police have generally got on top of it but as one source of supply closes another opens. not to mention dealing from cars parked in quiet side streets.
this modus operandi is not new and causes untold harm to the person whose property is taken over. In Worthing numerous cases have occurred over the last 5-7 years and in all cases the tenant was the looser often loosing there children into the care system as well as their flat. the police have generally got on top of it but as one source of supply closes another opens. not to mention dealing from cars parked in quiet side streets. John Steed
  • Score: 13

8:26am Tue 5 Aug 14

nissancars says...

my freind became a user and then an addict.it was horrible watching her become a wreck who sold herself for her next fix.people who knew her shunned her until she died.we blamed ourselves when we should of blamed the dealers.well done to the police and i think also every one should go to prison connected with this trade regardless of how minor a role they play.my freind was 24 years old when she died.
my freind became a user and then an addict.it was horrible watching her become a wreck who sold herself for her next fix.people who knew her shunned her until she died.we blamed ourselves when we should of blamed the dealers.well done to the police and i think also every one should go to prison connected with this trade regardless of how minor a role they play.my freind was 24 years old when she died. nissancars
  • Score: 29

8:38am Tue 5 Aug 14

s&k says...

Just legalise it, tax it, control the supply and cut out the criminal element.
Just legalise it, tax it, control the supply and cut out the criminal element. s&k
  • Score: -31

9:22am Tue 5 Aug 14

Mrbrightside1 says...

Thats my weekend **** up then!
Thats my weekend **** up then! Mrbrightside1
  • Score: -25

9:34am Tue 5 Aug 14

Farawaynow says...

I was living in the Netherlands at the end of the 70s' and saw the Turkish mafia flood that country with cheap very pure (90%) Turkish/Afghan 'red'.

The first weekend it became available between Rotterdam and A'dam, 20 junkies O/D even though the Turks warned them it was very pure.

I came home for Christmas/New Year and warned friends of mine not to touch this narcotic. Sadly one friend - 'a centre of influence' in particular did'nt believe what I said and proceeded to supply it to mutual friends - 2 dead in 3 years, another went to prison for fraud, his marriage finished and another whose son committed suicide in part from what he witnessed growing up. None of these were no hopers from sink council estates, they were all young professional people.

Put one smack dealer in an ordinary prison and 20 more will come out. If you must waste tax payers money putting junkies in prison then they must be totally segregated.

Legalising smack is not the answer, look at the biggest narcotic killer on the planet - alcohol, it's legal. Indeed for many alcohol is the gateway drug to smack - try reining in the legalised drug dealers - the alcohol industry and see what happens.

Sadly the truth is that any drug addiction is a real money spinner for the parasites that feed off it - lawyers/social workers/shrinks/ pharmaceutical industry, it is these parasitic scum who don't want a solution to the problem, they would have to look to make a good living doing something else.

Also let's lay to rest the b/s about smack addiction - if you smoke nicotine for 1 week you get hooked - you have to use smack, smoking it or injecting for around 3 months before you are hooked and that's the danger. For many this time lag lulls them into a false sense of security aided and abetted by the dealers.

They start out like my (former) friend only using at the weekend - soon the weekend begins bright and early on a Monday morning.
I was living in the Netherlands at the end of the 70s' and saw the Turkish mafia flood that country with cheap very pure (90%) Turkish/Afghan 'red'. The first weekend it became available between Rotterdam and A'dam, 20 junkies O/D even though the Turks warned them it was very pure. I came home for Christmas/New Year and warned friends of mine not to touch this narcotic. Sadly one friend - 'a centre of influence' in particular did'nt believe what I said and proceeded to supply it to mutual friends - 2 dead in 3 years, another went to prison for fraud, his marriage finished and another whose son committed suicide in part from what he witnessed growing up. None of these were no hopers from sink council estates, they were all young professional people. Put one smack dealer in an ordinary prison and 20 more will come out. If you must waste tax payers money putting junkies in prison then they must be totally segregated. Legalising smack is not the answer, look at the biggest narcotic killer on the planet - alcohol, it's legal. Indeed for many alcohol is the gateway drug to smack - try reining in the legalised drug dealers - the alcohol industry and see what happens. Sadly the truth is that any drug addiction is a real money spinner for the parasites that feed off it - lawyers/social workers/shrinks/ pharmaceutical industry, it is these parasitic scum who don't want a solution to the problem, they would have to look to make a good living doing something else. Also let's lay to rest the b/s about smack addiction - if you smoke nicotine for 1 week you get hooked - you have to use smack, smoking it or injecting for around 3 months before you are hooked and that's the danger. For many this time lag lulls them into a false sense of security aided and abetted by the dealers. They start out like my (former) friend only using at the weekend - soon the weekend begins bright and early on a Monday morning. Farawaynow
  • Score: 6

10:00am Tue 5 Aug 14

Goldenwight says...

stevensavage wrote:
congratulations to the police for getting these dealers of death locked up. however nobody should be given suspended sentences by the courts.every day we walk through our towns and city see the results of heroin users on every street corner.theres always someone ready and willing to take over from those in custody.to lock every one involved up no matter what role they play,sends a better message to people
What planet do you live on?
[quote][p][bold]stevensavage[/bold] wrote: congratulations to the police for getting these dealers of death locked up. however nobody should be given suspended sentences by the courts.every day we walk through our towns and city see the results of heroin users on every street corner.theres always someone ready and willing to take over from those in custody.to lock every one involved up no matter what role they play,sends a better message to people[/p][/quote]What planet do you live on? Goldenwight
  • Score: -20

10:54am Tue 5 Aug 14

nissancars says...

Goldenwight wrote:
stevensavage wrote:
congratulations to the police for getting these dealers of death locked up. however nobody should be given suspended sentences by the courts.every day we walk through our towns and city see the results of heroin users on every street corner.theres always someone ready and willing to take over from those in custody.to lock every one involved up no matter what role they play,sends a better message to people
What planet do you live on?
i live on planet earth which is blighted for my eveyday by knowing,reading about, drug users.having to lock my home up in case someone burgles my home or steals my car.i pay insurance to give me a small piece of mind that the things i could get stolen could be replaced.the sentimental things i would lose forever.most burglarys are commited for some kind of money for drugs. so unfortunately i live on the same planet as drug dealers,drug users and thousands of other type of criminals.
[quote][p][bold]Goldenwight[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]stevensavage[/bold] wrote: congratulations to the police for getting these dealers of death locked up. however nobody should be given suspended sentences by the courts.every day we walk through our towns and city see the results of heroin users on every street corner.theres always someone ready and willing to take over from those in custody.to lock every one involved up no matter what role they play,sends a better message to people[/p][/quote]What planet do you live on?[/p][/quote]i live on planet earth which is blighted for my eveyday by knowing,reading about, drug users.having to lock my home up in case someone burgles my home or steals my car.i pay insurance to give me a small piece of mind that the things i could get stolen could be replaced.the sentimental things i would lose forever.most burglarys are commited for some kind of money for drugs. so unfortunately i live on the same planet as drug dealers,drug users and thousands of other type of criminals. nissancars
  • Score: 28

11:03am Tue 5 Aug 14

firemanste says...

Goldenwight wrote:
stevensavage wrote:
congratulations to the police for getting these dealers of death locked up. however nobody should be given suspended sentences by the courts.every day we walk through our towns and city see the results of heroin users on every street corner.theres always someone ready and willing to take over from those in custody.to lock every one involved up no matter what role they play,sends a better message to people
What planet do you live on?
he lives on the same planet as myself and i also pay insurance like he does for some security that if im robbed by junkies or whoever decides they want to steal my hard earned belongings. the question should be which planet do you live on ?
[quote][p][bold]Goldenwight[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]stevensavage[/bold] wrote: congratulations to the police for getting these dealers of death locked up. however nobody should be given suspended sentences by the courts.every day we walk through our towns and city see the results of heroin users on every street corner.theres always someone ready and willing to take over from those in custody.to lock every one involved up no matter what role they play,sends a better message to people[/p][/quote]What planet do you live on?[/p][/quote]he lives on the same planet as myself and i also pay insurance like he does for some security that if im robbed by junkies or whoever decides they want to steal my hard earned belongings. the question should be which planet do you live on ? firemanste
  • Score: 26

11:08am Tue 5 Aug 14

firemanste says...

s&k wrote:
Just legalise it, tax it, control the supply and cut out the criminal element.
where would the user be getting the money from to buy the product. people say legalise it but its a hard drug that people steal,rob and even murder to get the money for. the criminal element will always be around it
[quote][p][bold]s&k[/bold] wrote: Just legalise it, tax it, control the supply and cut out the criminal element.[/p][/quote]where would the user be getting the money from to buy the product. people say legalise it but its a hard drug that people steal,rob and even murder to get the money for. the criminal element will always be around it firemanste
  • Score: 11

11:23am Tue 5 Aug 14

Hove Actually says...

Is this a council property?
Is she being evicted?
Why not?
Is this a council property? Is she being evicted? Why not? Hove Actually
  • Score: 9

11:27am Tue 5 Aug 14

Valerie Paynter says...

Wondering if this woman has been allowed to remain in her Ingram Crescent flat or if she was rehoused away from it to deter continuing dealing activity.
Wondering if this woman has been allowed to remain in her Ingram Crescent flat or if she was rehoused away from it to deter continuing dealing activity. Valerie Paynter
  • Score: 9

11:43am Tue 5 Aug 14

barnieb says...

Don't ya just love Liverpool?
Don't ya just love Liverpool? barnieb
  • Score: 18

12:54pm Tue 5 Aug 14

Fairfax Aches says...

We all know what the solution is to this problem, although no one is allowed to say due to political correctness gone mad.
We all know what the solution is to this problem, although no one is allowed to say due to political correctness gone mad. Fairfax Aches
  • Score: 4

12:54pm Tue 5 Aug 14

sussexram40 says...

The city is blighted by drugs,prostitution, violence, drunkenness and general sleaze.
It's time to clamp down on the anything goes culture which brings crime.
We need a zero tolerance clean up campaign not authorities supporting this lifestyle and waving flags for it.
The Police have made a rod for their own backs in Brighton. Now people think they can come here and do what they like.
The city is blighted by drugs,prostitution, violence, drunkenness and general sleaze. It's time to clamp down on the anything goes culture which brings crime. We need a zero tolerance clean up campaign not authorities supporting this lifestyle and waving flags for it. The Police have made a rod for their own backs in Brighton. Now people think they can come here and do what they like. sussexram40
  • Score: 15

12:57pm Tue 5 Aug 14

Dr Martin says...

s&k wrote:
Just legalise it, tax it, control the supply and cut out the criminal element.
No thank you
[quote][p][bold]s&k[/bold] wrote: Just legalise it, tax it, control the supply and cut out the criminal element.[/p][/quote]No thank you Dr Martin
  • Score: 14

12:59pm Tue 5 Aug 14

TheDrive says...

If this country had the same drug-sentencing policy as countries in the Far East like Singapore or Thailand, the decent majority would not have to see these sorts on the streets.
If this country had the same drug-sentencing policy as countries in the Far East like Singapore or Thailand, the decent majority would not have to see these sorts on the streets. TheDrive
  • Score: 10

2:16pm Tue 5 Aug 14

tooned_in says...

Heroin is destroying our city and the knock on effects of users are felt by us all dailiy.
I was forced to leave my property as the council gave a free flat next door to heroin dealers who were a nightmare from hour 1.
These sentances should be viewed as a great success so a big congrats to both the Police & the courts in this instance.
Heroin is destroying our city and the knock on effects of users are felt by us all dailiy. I was forced to leave my property as the council gave a free flat next door to heroin dealers who were a nightmare from hour 1. These sentances should be viewed as a great success so a big congrats to both the Police & the courts in this instance. tooned_in
  • Score: 12

3:43pm Tue 5 Aug 14

TIMBURRY says...

TheDrive wrote:
If this country had the same drug-sentencing policy as countries in the Far East like Singapore or Thailand, the decent majority would not have to see these sorts on the streets.
Singapore maybe, you don't want to go down the Thai way, believe me
[quote][p][bold]TheDrive[/bold] wrote: If this country had the same drug-sentencing policy as countries in the Far East like Singapore or Thailand, the decent majority would not have to see these sorts on the streets.[/p][/quote]Singapore maybe, you don't want to go down the Thai way, believe me TIMBURRY
  • Score: 6

3:52pm Tue 5 Aug 14

NickBrt says...

Greens must be in a dilemma here. They are all for drug use but against travelling which ruins the environment. What us their answer?
Greens must be in a dilemma here. They are all for drug use but against travelling which ruins the environment. What us their answer? NickBrt
  • Score: 12

6:05pm Tue 5 Aug 14

HJarrs says...

NickBrt wrote:
Greens must be in a dilemma here. They are all for drug use but against travelling which ruins the environment. What us their answer?
Same old rubbish eh?
[quote][p][bold]NickBrt[/bold] wrote: Greens must be in a dilemma here. They are all for drug use but against travelling which ruins the environment. What us their answer?[/p][/quote]Same old rubbish eh? HJarrs
  • Score: -12

6:42pm Tue 5 Aug 14

stevo!! says...

So comments containing Caroline Lucas's support for Brighton's drug culture get removed?

I won't repost one, then.
So comments containing Caroline Lucas's support for Brighton's drug culture get removed? I won't repost one, then. stevo!!
  • Score: 3

8:12pm Tue 5 Aug 14

NickBrt says...

Poor hjarrs SO deluded!
Poor hjarrs SO deluded! NickBrt
  • Score: 6

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