Fringe seeks artist for brochure cover

2013 designer Carlos Garde-Martin

2013 designer Carlos Garde-Martin

First published in News by

THE COUNTRY’S largest arts festival is looking for a budding artist to design next year’s brochure cover.

The chosen artist will see their work appear on the front of more than 100,000 Brighton Fringe programmes as well as on posters and banners around the city.

It is the third time the event has offered a local artist the chance to design the cover.

The chosen illustrator in 2013 was Carlos Garde-Martin, from Brighton.

He said: “It was one of the best experiences I've ever had. Brighton Fringe were great to work with.

“I enjoyed having my work literally everywhere in the town I live in - it was an incredible privilege.

“As a result, more people started buying my work online, I was commissioned by a French magazine as well as having other projects in the pipeline including a big contract with Network Rail.”

Fringe organisers are calling on budding cover designers to send their portfolio, links to work and a short email detailing why they want to work with Brighton Fringe by midday on September 5.

Selected applications will be sent a more detailed brief and invited to put together some initial sketches.

The final candidate will be chosen by September 26, with the majority of work expected to be completed in November.

While the commission is unpaid, expenses of up to £1,000 can be covered.

Julian Caddy, director of Brighton Fringe, urged interested artists to come forward.

He said: “The search for an artist for our creative campaign is always an exciting time as it marks the beginning of a process which defines the public profile of the biggest event of the year in Brighton and Hove.

“It’s quite a journey that we take together so we are looking for someone who can capture the essence of what makes Brighton Fringe what it is and work with us to bring it to life.

“Just as the festival is a showcase for performers, the creative campaign gives a unique platform for the chosen artist’s work to be seen by literally millions of people.”

Anyone interested should send their portfolio along with an email outlining why they want the commission to rosie.blackwellsutton@brightonfringe.org by September 5.

Comments (8)

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11:28am Mon 18 Aug 14

billy goat-gruff says...

Why unpaid? I expect they pay their printers and I also expect Mr Caddy gets paid, so why should artists work for free? Try phoning a plumber and saying do the work for free, it'll be good for your portfolio!
Why unpaid? I expect they pay their printers and I also expect Mr Caddy gets paid, so why should artists work for free? Try phoning a plumber and saying do the work for free, it'll be good for your portfolio! billy goat-gruff
  • Score: 6

11:52am Mon 18 Aug 14

Falhawk66 says...

Typical nonsense, they need to pay for this, not expect work for free.
Typical nonsense, they need to pay for this, not expect work for free. Falhawk66
  • Score: 4

12:12pm Mon 18 Aug 14

jeremy radvan says...

All that work that Mr Caddy does for Huffington Post and the Fringe is going to be paid for, it is not good enough to expect a young person to do the poster job for free. I am afraid it is the product of an internship dominated arts sector that does not expect to pay young people for good work. If the poster is useful to the Fringe then they should pay a decent fee for it.
All that work that Mr Caddy does for Huffington Post and the Fringe is going to be paid for, it is not good enough to expect a young person to do the poster job for free. I am afraid it is the product of an internship dominated arts sector that does not expect to pay young people for good work. If the poster is useful to the Fringe then they should pay a decent fee for it. jeremy radvan
  • Score: 5

12:13pm Mon 18 Aug 14

notslimjim says...

The artist gets free exposure that many would give their arm for.
The artist gets free exposure that many would give their arm for. notslimjim
  • Score: -4

12:25pm Mon 18 Aug 14

GreggWallace says...

notslimjim wrote:
The artist gets free exposure that many would give their arm for.
Be that as it may what message does it send that an arts festival that brings in thousands of visitors to the city from near and far, requires the contributions of an artist's work on their brochure which they value so much that they have decided that contribution is worth the grand total of not paying them a single penny.

That is the message Brighton Fringe are sending out - this cover was worth paying absolute nothing for.

How do they expect these people to live? On air out in the wild countryside with no shelter?

This is blatantly taking advantage of someone's enthusiasm to do it for free. I can't see how it would hurt the fringe's coffers too much to say, you done some amazing work, we really appreciate it, here's a bit of money which you can reinvest back into your work to produce more amazing works.

Instead they're saying, we want your work, give it me, I will take it from you for nothing because it's not worth a penny to us and worse still we will use friendly social media age speak to make us sound oh so Shoreditch and hip in advertising this generous venture of ours as if we are the ones doing you a favour.

There is no doubt that having your work featured on the cover is a fabulous thing to have, but the Fringe sends out the message that art is produced from nothing and worth nothing.

I'm not suggesting that artists are paid great riches, but there has to be some value to the work, otherwise we're turning away those who may be extremely talented but due to background and financial circumstances don't find it viable to work as an artist and are consigned to working in a call centre, whilst the mummy and daddy set of interns and the likes are able to support themselves by doing all this 'worth nothing' work because they have the financial security to do so; which means you are going to get a very distorted world of art eventually.

The Argus does the same, virtually no staff photographers, the odd freelancer, but everybody else, send us your pics because it means we can use them for free!

All this equates to an erosion of the artist having any chance of making a viable living, leaving the only money in art for the very big names and leaving a vast gulf in between.
[quote][p][bold]notslimjim[/bold] wrote: The artist gets free exposure that many would give their arm for.[/p][/quote]Be that as it may what message does it send that an arts festival that brings in thousands of visitors to the city from near and far, requires the contributions of an artist's work on their brochure which they value so much that they have decided that contribution is worth the grand total of not paying them a single penny. That is the message Brighton Fringe are sending out - this cover was worth paying absolute nothing for. How do they expect these people to live? On air out in the wild countryside with no shelter? This is blatantly taking advantage of someone's enthusiasm to do it for free. I can't see how it would hurt the fringe's coffers too much to say, you done some amazing work, we really appreciate it, here's a bit of money which you can reinvest back into your work to produce more amazing works. Instead they're saying, we want your work, give it me, I will take it from you for nothing because it's not worth a penny to us and worse still we will use friendly social media age speak to make us sound oh so Shoreditch and hip in advertising this generous venture of ours as if we are the ones doing you a favour. There is no doubt that having your work featured on the cover is a fabulous thing to have, but the Fringe sends out the message that art is produced from nothing and worth nothing. I'm not suggesting that artists are paid great riches, but there has to be some value to the work, otherwise we're turning away those who may be extremely talented but due to background and financial circumstances don't find it viable to work as an artist and are consigned to working in a call centre, whilst the mummy and daddy set of interns and the likes are able to support themselves by doing all this 'worth nothing' work because they have the financial security to do so; which means you are going to get a very distorted world of art eventually. The Argus does the same, virtually no staff photographers, the odd freelancer, but everybody else, send us your pics because it means we can use them for free! All this equates to an erosion of the artist having any chance of making a viable living, leaving the only money in art for the very big names and leaving a vast gulf in between. GreggWallace
  • Score: 4

3:35pm Mon 18 Aug 14

notslimjim says...

GreggWallace wrote:
notslimjim wrote:
The artist gets free exposure that many would give their arm for.
Be that as it may what message does it send that an arts festival that brings in thousands of visitors to the city from near and far, requires the contributions of an artist's work on their brochure which they value so much that they have decided that contribution is worth the grand total of not paying them a single penny.

That is the message Brighton Fringe are sending out - this cover was worth paying absolute nothing for.

How do they expect these people to live? On air out in the wild countryside with no shelter?

This is blatantly taking advantage of someone's enthusiasm to do it for free. I can't see how it would hurt the fringe's coffers too much to say, you done some amazing work, we really appreciate it, here's a bit of money which you can reinvest back into your work to produce more amazing works.

Instead they're saying, we want your work, give it me, I will take it from you for nothing because it's not worth a penny to us and worse still we will use friendly social media age speak to make us sound oh so Shoreditch and hip in advertising this generous venture of ours as if we are the ones doing you a favour.

There is no doubt that having your work featured on the cover is a fabulous thing to have, but the Fringe sends out the message that art is produced from nothing and worth nothing.

I'm not suggesting that artists are paid great riches, but there has to be some value to the work, otherwise we're turning away those who may be extremely talented but due to background and financial circumstances don't find it viable to work as an artist and are consigned to working in a call centre, whilst the mummy and daddy set of interns and the likes are able to support themselves by doing all this 'worth nothing' work because they have the financial security to do so; which means you are going to get a very distorted world of art eventually.

The Argus does the same, virtually no staff photographers, the odd freelancer, but everybody else, send us your pics because it means we can use them for free!

All this equates to an erosion of the artist having any chance of making a viable living, leaving the only money in art for the very big names and leaving a vast gulf in between.
You're completely missing the point.

It's a chance for unknown artists to receive massive exposure which they wouldn't normally receive.

This year's chosen artist is delighted by the chance and says that he's started to be become noticed.

Why deny that chance to people?
[quote][p][bold]GreggWallace[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]notslimjim[/bold] wrote: The artist gets free exposure that many would give their arm for.[/p][/quote]Be that as it may what message does it send that an arts festival that brings in thousands of visitors to the city from near and far, requires the contributions of an artist's work on their brochure which they value so much that they have decided that contribution is worth the grand total of not paying them a single penny. That is the message Brighton Fringe are sending out - this cover was worth paying absolute nothing for. How do they expect these people to live? On air out in the wild countryside with no shelter? This is blatantly taking advantage of someone's enthusiasm to do it for free. I can't see how it would hurt the fringe's coffers too much to say, you done some amazing work, we really appreciate it, here's a bit of money which you can reinvest back into your work to produce more amazing works. Instead they're saying, we want your work, give it me, I will take it from you for nothing because it's not worth a penny to us and worse still we will use friendly social media age speak to make us sound oh so Shoreditch and hip in advertising this generous venture of ours as if we are the ones doing you a favour. There is no doubt that having your work featured on the cover is a fabulous thing to have, but the Fringe sends out the message that art is produced from nothing and worth nothing. I'm not suggesting that artists are paid great riches, but there has to be some value to the work, otherwise we're turning away those who may be extremely talented but due to background and financial circumstances don't find it viable to work as an artist and are consigned to working in a call centre, whilst the mummy and daddy set of interns and the likes are able to support themselves by doing all this 'worth nothing' work because they have the financial security to do so; which means you are going to get a very distorted world of art eventually. The Argus does the same, virtually no staff photographers, the odd freelancer, but everybody else, send us your pics because it means we can use them for free! All this equates to an erosion of the artist having any chance of making a viable living, leaving the only money in art for the very big names and leaving a vast gulf in between.[/p][/quote]You're completely missing the point. It's a chance for unknown artists to receive massive exposure which they wouldn't normally receive. This year's chosen artist is delighted by the chance and says that he's started to be become noticed. Why deny that chance to people? notslimjim
  • Score: -1

4:10pm Mon 18 Aug 14

Rosie Blackwell-Sutton says...

Brighton Fringe are, for the first time ever, offering the artist a £1000 fee towards expenses, to be used as they see fit. The artist will also see a cut of any profit made on merchandise sales featuring their artwork. We see this as an opportunity for the artist to build their portfolio and get a high level of exposure that will hopefully see them go on to get high level commissions (2013’s cover artist has since been commissioned by Network Rail off the back of his Brighton Fringe work).

Brighton Fringe is a registered charity and does not make profit from any of our year-round activities supporting thousands of participants and audiences. We are always looking for new ways to help artists and performers promote their art and make a success of their work in difficult financial times.

(writing on behalf of Brighton Fringe)
Brighton Fringe are, for the first time ever, offering the artist a £1000 fee towards expenses, to be used as they see fit. The artist will also see a cut of any profit made on merchandise sales featuring their artwork. We see this as an opportunity for the artist to build their portfolio and get a high level of exposure that will hopefully see them go on to get high level commissions (2013’s cover artist has since been commissioned by Network Rail off the back of his Brighton Fringe work). Brighton Fringe is a registered charity and does not make profit from any of our year-round activities supporting thousands of participants and audiences. We are always looking for new ways to help artists and performers promote their art and make a success of their work in difficult financial times. (writing on behalf of Brighton Fringe) Rosie Blackwell-Sutton
  • Score: 0

5:52pm Mon 18 Aug 14

Loutaylor says...

So does everyone who works for Brighton Fringe do so for free because 'it's good for their portfolio'?! Shame on them for not supporting artists and illustrators properly. Being paid would be even better for your portfolio. Why not make the £1000 the fee instead of just expenses and show some respect?! It's not giving out the right message for an arts festival.
So does everyone who works for Brighton Fringe do so for free because 'it's good for their portfolio'?! Shame on them for not supporting artists and illustrators properly. Being paid would be even better for your portfolio. Why not make the £1000 the fee instead of just expenses and show some respect?! It's not giving out the right message for an arts festival. Loutaylor
  • Score: 2

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